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3150bb 






UNITED STATES 



NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION 



NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE 



COMMERCIAL FISHERIES RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ACT 



FINAL REPORT 



State : Massachusetts 

Sub-Project No.: 3-287-R-5 

Project Title: Coastwide Fishery Resource Assessment 

Sub-Project Title: Fishery Resource Assessment, Coastal Massachusetts 

Period covered: January 21, 1982 - January 20, 1983 

Prepared by: Arnold B. Howe, Senior Marine Fisheries Biologist Date: 5/1U/8M- 
Thomas P. Currier, Marine Fisheries Biologist 
Sherry L. Sass, Assistant Marine Fieheries Biologist 
Brian C. Kelly, Assistant Marine Fisheries Biologist 



Approved by : 







Assistant Director Date 







\s 



nOVERNMENT OOCUMEK 
COLLECTION 

FEB 7 1985 

University of Massachusetts 
Depository Copy 



PUBLICATION: #13639-I30-70-6-84-CR 
APPROVED BY Daniel Carter, State Purchasing Agent 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries 



http://archive.org/details/coastwidefishery8283mass 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 
Number 

LIST OF FIGURES, JOB 1 

LIST OF TABLES, JOB 1 

ABSTRACT i 

Job 1: Fishery Resource Assessment, Coastal Massachusetts 

INTRODUCTION 1 

FIELD AND ANALYTICAL PROCEDURES 1 

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 2 

SPRING CRUISE #8291 3 

AUTUMN CRUISE #8292 4 

YELLOWTAIL FLOUNDER 6 

WINTER FLOUNDER 8 

SUMMER FLOUNDER 12 

SCUP 12 

LONGFIN SQUID 14 

OVERVIEW 16 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 18 

REFERENCES 18 

Job 2: Evaluation of winter flounder year-class strength 

INTRODUCTION 21 

METHODS 21 

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 23 

REFERENCES 24 



LIST OF FIGURES, JOB 1 



Sampling strata used in Massachusetts DMF inshore bottom survey . . . Figure 1 

Mean bottom water temperatures encountered on spring (— — ) and 

autumn ( ) cruises of Massachusetts inshore waters, 1978-82 . . . Figure 2 

Yellowtail flounder length frequencies (percent at length) 

from spring and autumn inshore Massachusetts research surveys, 

1978-82 Figure 3 

Indices of abundance from spring ( ) and autumn ( ) 

research vessel surveys for yellowtail flounder from Massa- 
chusetts inshore waters Figure 4 

Indices of abundance from spring ( ) and autumn ( ) 

research vessel surveys for winter flounder from Massachusetts 

inshore waters Figure 5 

Winter flounder mean indices of abundance (0) and 95% confidence 

interval (bracket) from spring surveys by Massachusetts inshore 

region, 1978-1982 Figure 6 

Winter flounder length-frequencies (percent at length) from 

spring and autumn inshore Massachusetts research surveys, 

1978-1982 Figure 7 

Indices of abundance from spring ( ) and autumn ( ) 

research vessel surveys for summer flounder from Massachusetts 

inshore waters .... Figure 8 

Summer flounder length- frequencies (percent at length) from 

spring and autumn inshore Massachusetts research surveys, 

1978-1982 Figure 9 

Indices of abundance from spring ( ) and autumn ( ) research 

vessel surveys for scup from Massachusetts inshore waters Figure 10 

Scup length-frequencies (percent at length) from spring and 

autumn inshore Massachusetts research surveys, 1978-1982 Figure 11 

Loligo length-frequencies (percent at length) from spring and 

autumn inshore Massachusetts research surveys, 1978-1982 Figure 12 

Indices of abundance from spring (-^ — ) and autumn ( ) 

research vessel surveys for longfin squid from Massachusetts 

inshore waters Figure 13 

Autumn DMF inshore bottom trawl survey prerecruit (_< 8 cm) 

indices for Loligo pealei compared to subsequent spring 

number indices (all sizes) and Massachusetts commercial 

landings (rr — ) , 1978-1982 Figure 14 



LIST OF FIGURES, JOB 1 (continued) 



Indices of abundance from spring ( ) and autumn ( ) 

research vessel surveys for Atlantic cod from Massachusetts 

inshore waters Figure 15 

Indices of abundance from spring ( ) and autumn ( ) 

research vessel surveys for haddock from Massachusetts 

inshore waters Figure 16 

Indices of abundance from spring ( ) and autumn ( ) 

research vessel surveys for silver hake from Massachusetts 

inshore waters Figure 17 

Indices of abundance from spring ( ) and autumn ( ) 

research vessel surveys for red hake from Massachusetts 

inshore waters Figure 18 

Indices of abundance from spring ( ) and autumn ( ) 

research vessel surveys for white hake from Massachusetts 

inshore waters Figure 19 

Indices of abundance from spring ( ) and autumn ( ) 

research vessel surveys for black sea bass from Massachusetts 

inshore waters Figure 20 

Indices of abundance from spring ( ) and autumn ( ) 

research vessel surveys for tautog from Massachusetts 

inshore waters Figure 21 

Indices of abundance from spring ( ) and autumn ( ) 

research vessel surveys for ocean pout from Massachusetts 

inshore waters Figure 22 

Indices of abundance from spring ( ) and autumn ( ) 

research vessel surveys for northern searobin from Massa- 
chusetts inshore waters Figure 23 

Indices of abundance from spring ( ) and autumn ( ) 

research vessel surveys for longhorn sculpin from Massa- 
chusetts inshore waters Figure 24 

Indices of abundance from spring ( ) and autumn ( ) 

research vessel surveys for American plaice from Massachusetts 

inshore waters Figure 25 

Indices of abundnace from spring ( ) and autumn ( ) 

research vessel surveys for witch flounder from Massachusetts 

inshore waters Figure 26 



LIST OF FIGURES, JOB 1 (continued) 



Indices of abundance from spring ( ) and autumn ( ) 

research vessel surveys for windowpane from Massachusetts 

inshore waters Figure 27 

Indices of abundance from spring ( ) and autumn ( ) 

research vessel surveys for Atlantic herring from Massa- 
chusetts inshore waters Figure 28 

Indices of abundance from spring ( ) and autumn ( ) 

research vessel surveys for butterfish from Massachusetts 

inshore waters Figure 29 

Indices of abundance from spring ( ) and autumn ( ) 

research vessel surveys for sand lance from Massachusetts 

inshore waters Figure 30 

Indices of abundance from spring ( ) and autumn ( ) 

research vessel surveys for spiny dogfish from Massachusetts 

inshore waters Figure 31 

Indices of abundance from spring ( ) and autumn ( ) 

research vessel surveys for little skate from Massachusetts 

inshore waters Figure 32 

Indices of abundance from spring ( ) and autumn ( ) 

research vessel surveys for winter skate from Massachusetts 

inshore waters Figure 33 

Indices of abundance from spring ( ) and autumn ( ) 

research vessel surveys for American lobster from Massachusetts 

inshore waters Figure 34 

Indices of abundance from spring ( ) and autumn ( ) 

research vessel surveys for rock crab from Massachusetts 

inshore waters Figure 35 

Indices of abundance from spring ( ) and autumn ( ) 

research vessel surveys for all species from Massachusetts 

inshore waters Figure 36 



LIST OF TABLES, JOB 1 



Allotment of sampling effort to Massachusetts inshore strata, 1982 

survey cruises Table 

Summary of Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries bottom trawl 
survey cruises effort and results, Massachusetts territorial waters, 
1978-1982 Table 

Weight (kilograms) and number for species collected during the 

1982 spring and autumn bottom trawl surveys, Massachusetts 

territorial waters Table 

Stratified mean number per tow of age 1 (5-22 cm) yellowtail 
flounder from DMF spring and autumn research vessel surveys in 
Massachusetts inshore waters, 1978-1982 Table 

Stratified mean catch per tow in number for prerecruit and all size 

winter flounder for regions 1-5, Massachusetts DMF inshore spring 

bottom trawl survey, 1978-1982 Table 

Stratified mean number per tow of age 0, age 1, and adult scup 

taken in Massachusetts inshore bottom trawl surveys, spring and 

autumn, 1978-1982 Table 

Total and prerecruit ( < 8 cm) stratified mean numbers per tow of 
longfin squid from DMF autumn research vessel surveys in Massa- 
chusetts inshore waters Table 

Percentage of prerecruit fish of 23 commercially valuable species 

taken by region (principal abundance) and coastwide on combined 

1978-82 Massachusetts spring inshore surveys Table 

Average bottom temperature by depth interval and region, Massa- 
chusetts inshore bottom trawl surveys, spring and autumn, 
1982 Appendix Table 

Stratified mean number per tow (untransformed) 
by length- frequency intervals for regions 1-5, 
Massachusetts inshore bottom trawl surveys, 
spring and autumn, 1982 

Atlantic cod Appendix Table 

Haddock Appendix Table 

Silver hake Appendix Table 

Red hake Appendix Table 

White hake Appendix Table 



2 
3 

5 
6 



LIST OF TABLES, JOB 1 (continued) 



Stratified mean number per tow (untransformed) 
by length- frequency intervals for regions 1-5, 
Massachusetts inshore bottom trawl surveys, 
spring and autumn, 1982 



Scup 

Black sea bass 
Tautog 
Ocean pout 
Northern searobin 
Longhorn sculp in 
Yellowtail flounder 
Winter flounder 
Summer flounder 
American plaice 
Witch flounder 
Windowpane 
Atlantic herring 
Butterfish 
Sand lance 
Spiny dogfish 
Little skate 
Winter skate 
Longfin squid 
American lobster 
Rock crab 



Appendix 


Table 


7 


Appendix 


Table 


8 


Appendix 


Table 


9 


Appendix 


Table 


10 


Appendix 


Table 


11 


Appendix 


Table 


12 


Appendix 


Table 


13 


Appendix 


Table 


14 


Appendix 


Table 


15 


Appendix 


Table 


16 


Appendix 


Table 


17 


Appendix 


Table 


18 


Appendix 


Table 


19 


Appendix 


Table 


20 


Appendix 


Table 


21 


Appendix 


Table 


22 


Appendix 


Table 


23 


Appendix 


Table 


2H 


Appendix 


Table 


25 


Appendix 


Table 


26 


Appendix 


Table 


27 



ABSTRACT 



In 1982 the Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries concluded a five 
year, standardized bottom trawl survey program for independently monitoring 
fish stocks during May and September in state territorial waters (Job #1). 
The resulting computerized database consisted of species catch (weight, number, 
and length- frequency) from 965 randomly selected stations which were stratified 
by depth zones and distributed with a sampling intensity of One station per 
20 sq n mi. 

In spring 1982, average coastwide bottom water temperature was the 
coldest encountered in the five-year timeseries. Spring indices of abundance 
for the majority of 26 species either remained at about the same relatively 
high level of biomass noted in 1981 or declined to levels noted in 1980. For 
principal groundfish (Atlantic cod, haddock, yellowtail flounder, and winter 
flounder), prerecruit and all other size category indices declined. East and 
south of Cape Cod, age cod (Georges Bank stock) were well-distributed but 
only half as abundant as in 1981. Summer flounder and longfin squid were more 
abundant because of good recruitment. 

By autumn, average bottom temperature declined 2.1° C from the 1981 mean, 
reversing a 1979-81 upward trend. A two- to three-year downward trend in 
abundance for many species was reversed. All north-temperate flounder species 
and juvenile Atlantic herring indices were elevated. The yellowtail flounder 
index of 1-year-olds indicated that the 1981 year-class was below average in 
strength (Cape Cod ground stock). No yearling haddock were caught (Gulf of 
Maine stock). Catch-per-tow at age doubled from 1981 for scup, black sea bass, 
butt erf ish, and longfin squid. 

Seasonal distribution and movements, trends in abundance, and assessment 
of age groups, including pre-exploitable and recruiting size groups were 
described for five important species commercially fished in state waters. For 
yellowtail flounder ( Limanda ferruginea ), a seasonal, inshore migration of 
yearlings was documented; their catch indices in autumn provided a forecast of 
year-class strength and recruitment to the Cape Cod ground fishery. After 
excessive 1980 cropping of a strong 1978 cohort, the fishery became largely 
dependent upon an equally strong 1979 year class which sustained catches through 
1982. 

Winter flounder ( Pseudopleuronectes americanus ) seasonal movements, 
related to water temperature, were consistent with earlier tagging results for 
adult fish; juveniles, moving less extensively, were found to be available to 
capture in most study regions at depths < 27 m. Length- frequency modes reflect 
predominance of fast-growing fish in spring and slower-growing individuals of 
the same cohort in autumn. Only the 1977 cohort, first appearing in the 1978 
research catch, appeared dominant. Trends in prerecruit and total abundance 
indices were downward in most study regions. 



Nearly all summer flounder ( Paralichthys dentatus ) caught were larger 
than 33 cm (age 3 and older). Inshore abundance declined through 1980, then 
rose to a high in 1982 because of strong recruitment of the 1979 year-class. 
A decrease in the survey catch of fluke greater than 50 cm after 1980 may be 
an indication of growth overfishing. 

Until 1981, spring scup ( Stenotomus chrysops ) catches consisted largely 
of prespawning age 2 and older fish. Since then, 1- and 2-year-olds have 
dominated; this shift may be related to lower water temperatures delaying inshore 
migration of adults. Autumn indices of age fish, which comprise over 90% of 
the fall catch, have not proven predictive of recruiting year-classes as evidenced 
by spring survey indices. 

In southern Massachusetts inshore waters, September spawning of longfin 
squid ( Loligo pealei ) appears to be more important than summer spawning. A 
"late" 1981 cohort and "early" 1982 cohort contributed to exceptional 1983 
spring abundance levels. Recruitment has been relatively independent of spawn- 
ing stock abundance. Trends in autumn prerecruit indices track the following 
spring's survey catch and mirror annual Massachusetts commercial landings. 

A standardized beach seining survey designed to quantify winter flounder 
spawning success in southern Cape Cod estuaries was evaluated as a predictor of 
recruitment to the stock unit (Job #2). The 1977 year-class was reliably 
assessed as the strongest in the survey timeseries (1975-1982). It proved to 
be a major component of research trawl catches from at least 1978 through 1980, 
evidently enhancing stock biomass as reflected by high 1980 and 1981 commercial 
landings . 



li 



Job 1: Fishery Resource Assessment, Coastal Massachusetts 



INTRODUCTION 

In 1978, the Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries (DMF) initiated 
a semiannual survey of fishes in the state's territorial sea as described by a 
three nautical mile wide border extending from Rhode Island to New Hampshire 
boundaries including Cape Cod Bay and, for survey purposes, Nantucket Sound 
(1,913 sq n mi). Specific cruise objectives were to: 1) estimate relative 
abundance of groundfish and certain shellfish species by weight and number; 
2) determine periodic trends in finfish abundance, population structure, and 
species composition; 3) collect information on age and growth, maturity, food 
habits, mortality, and recruitment; 4) describe fish distribution in relation 
to temperature, salinity, and depth. 

This study was partially funded through the Commercial Fisheries Research 
and Development Act (PL 88-309) under Project 3-287-R for five years (1978-82). 
It will continue through 1985 under Project 3-375-R. Reports on cruises con- 
ducted from 1978-81 have been completed. This report describes the general 
status and standard indices of abundance of major fisheries surveyed on the 
1982 cruises. In this final report of the original 5-year project, we also 
analyze the record of seasonal abundance and distribution for five species of 
principal importance to fishermen of state territorial waters (yellowtail 
flounder, winter flounder, summer flounder, scup, and longfin squid). 



FIELD AND ANALYTICAL PROCEDURES 

The F/V FRANCES ELIZABETH (55', 170 SHP) had been chartered for the first 
eight survey cruises. In 1982, because of state budgetary reductions, the DMF 
engaged the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) newly 
acquired R/V GLORIA MICHELLE (65', 365 SHP) to insure its future availability. 

The DMF provided the standard sampling gear - a 3/4 North Atlantic type 
two seam trawl (39' headrope/51' footrope). Net mesh varied depending upon the 
section (3.5, 2.5, 1.5") and the codend liner measured 0.64 cm (0.25"). The 
trawl was fished with a rubber disc (3.0") chain sweep, rectangular wooden doors 
(6' x 40", 325 lbs), and 10 fathom legs. 

Changing vessels led us to consider differences in the vessels' fishing 
power, gear handling, and maintenance. With respect to the former, the GLORIA 
MICHELLE was able to "down power" and fish the trawl in a manner consistent with 
the trawl's performance on the FRANCES ELIZABETH. Gear performance trials under- 
taken aboard the latter vessel in 1981 and on the GLORIA MICHELLE in 1983, 
maintaining standard gear operation factors, showed identical average fishing 
height (5') and wingspread (24'). A comparative fishing study between the two 
vessels was not undertaken because of budgetary and time considerations. 



The study area was divided into physiographic regions which were sub- 
divided into depth zones, i.e., strata (Figure 1). Individual strata were 
grouped by region (strata set) to make data meaningful for resource managers. 
The regions are: 1) Buzzards Bay, Vineyard Sound, and coastal water south of 
Martha's Vineyard; 2) Nantucket Sound; 3) East of Cape Cod, Race Point to 
Muskeget Island; 4) Cape Cod Bay; and, 5) Massachusetts Bay north to the New 
Hampshire border. 

One hundred stations were allocated to strata approximately in pro- 
portion to the area of each stratum (Table 1). Prior to 1982, station selection 
was undertaken at sea (i.e., the trawl was set on first-encountered trawlable 
bottom within each depth stratum) except in Cape Cod Bay where from September, 
1980, we utilized a conventional randomized pre-selection method. Based on our 
increasing familiarity with the study area's substratum, and to further minimize 
steaming time, a randomized station selection method was adopted for all sam- 
pling regions beginning with the spring 1982 cruise. As on previous surveys, 
20-minute tows were made along depth contours at a speed of 2.5 knots with the 
trawl warp scoped at 3:1. 

In processing the catch, standard survey techniques and trawl logs were 
employed. Following the catch sort by species, weights and length- frequencies 
were recorded. Materials for ageing, requested special samples, and biological 
observations were routinely collected. 

Standard survey abundance indices were generated using the Woods Hole 
Oceanographic Institution's Digital VAX-11 computer and Northeast Fisheries 
Center (NEFC) software modified to accept DMF inshore strata designations and 
limits, areal weighting coefficients, and sampling gear. Our completed trawl 
logs were entered by NEFC personnel and keyed. Station and biological data 
files were subjected to audit programs in order to detect recording and entry 
errors. Corrected files were again keyed and converted from fixed to variable 
length records, then processed by the survey analysis program (SURVAN). 

For each designated species, SURVAN computed by stratum the mean, 
variance, and standard error of the mean for catch/ tow in weight (kilograms) and 
number and produced an average individual weight. These same species' statistics 
were also generated for each strata set and for the entire cruise. A species' 
catch length- frequency listing (i.e., stratified mean number/tow at 1 cm intervals) 
for each stratum, strata set, and cruise was also derived from SURVAN. Total 
weight and number by species for each tow, stratum, and cruise were computed by 
the SPPTOT program. 



RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 

A summary of 1982 survey cruise effort and collections is presented in 
Table 2 along with data from all previous cruises. A total of 87 fish and 
shellfish species was collected and processed during the 1982 surveys (Table 3). 



SPRING CRUISE #8291 

A prolonged period of easterly winds in May undoubtedly suppressed normal 
seasonal warming of the inshore water. Except in region 2, average bottom water 
temperatures were the coldest encountered in the timeseries (Figure 2, Appendix 
Table 1), averaging 7.8° C on a coastwide basis, 0.7° C colder than in 1981: 

SPRING 



Average Temperature (°C) Average Salinity (%o) 



1978 
1979 
1980 
1981 
1982 



Cruise Dates 

12 May- 11 Jun 
30 Apr- 2 7 May 

5 May- 24 May 

6 May- 21 May 
4 May- 21 May 



Surface 


Bottom 


Surface 


13.1 


10.7 


30.9 


11.2 


8.9 


30.9 


10.6 


9.1 


31.9 


9.8 


8.5 


30.7 


10.2 


7.8 


31.9 



In spring 1981, abundance indices for many dominant species increased 
dramatically. We believe that the relatively depressed spring temperatures 
delayed the seasonal offshore movement of many groundfish and other stocks, 
temporarily retaining fish in the study area. 

In 1982, except for several migratory species that had not moved inshore 
in number, the majority of species either remained at about the same relatively 
high level of biomass noted in 1981 (e.g., ocean pout, +1%; windowpane, +2%; 
sand lance, -1%; and longhorn sculpin, -6%) or declined to lower levels, cor- 
responding for the most part to those noted in 1980. The spring "all species" 
biomass index was 5% lower in 1982 than 1981. The corresponding number index 
was unduly influenced by one very large catch of mussels (Table 3). 



Among the species principally caught by us in the inshore waters of the 
Gulf of Maine, prerecruit-size ( < 37 cm) Atlantic cod were about one- third as 
abundant as in 1981. In comparison to the previous four years, age (< 14 cm) 
cod were taken in very low numbers, which suggests a weak 1982 year-class (Gulf 
of Maine stock). Although age 1 haddock were present in low numbers in 1980 
and 1981, they were virtually nonexistent in 1982 indicating that the 1981 
cohort was even weaker than the previous two year-classes. Survey catch bio- 
mass of red, white, and silver hake was more than 75% lower than in 1981, with 
each species' index at a timeseries low. 

For each of the north-temperate flounders, biomass increased in 1981 but 
declined in 1982 (reductions of 31% for winter flounder, 23% for American plaice, 
70% for witch flounder, and 21% for yellowtail flounder) to catches about equal 
to those of 1980. Numbers of all size yellowtail flounder declined by 49% this 
spring. The 1982 prerecruit index was the lowest in the timeseries at 1.8 fish/ 
tow. 



Rock crab biomass (1.55 kg/tow) was 26% lower than in spring, 1981. 
American lobster biomass declined by 64% reflecting reduced availability and 
lower spring catches experienced by commercial lobster fishermen. 

Atlantic herring abundance continued its downward trend to a timeseries 
low. For the third consecutive spring, juvenile sea herring (ages 1 and 2, 
*< 23 cm) catches declined in Cape Cod Bay. 

The situation east and south of Cape Cod was somewhat different. Species 
showing general increases in biomass, i.e., where no especially strong-recruiting 
size groups were evident, included tautog (108%), northern searobin (105%), and 
spiny dogfish (35%). 

Elevated catches in particular size categories improved the outlook for 
summer flounder (fluke), black sea bass, and longfin squid. The reappearance 
of the 1979 cohort of fluke at age 3 raised the abundance index for the second 
successive spring; biomass was 32% greater than in 1981 with fish being unusually 
concentrated along the outer Cape and Islands (region 3). Although black sea 
bass biomass declined by 31%, the number index remained the same because 20-30 cm 
(age 2) sea bass were more abundant. This recruitment was interesting inasmuch as 
our autumn, 1980 young-of-the-year (YOY) prerecruit index was higher (51.8 fish/ 
tow) than in prior years. Longfin squid biomass was 23% higher than in 1981 
mainly because 2-19 cm squid (early-and late-spawned 1981 cohorts) were more 
abundant . 

The adult scup (> 15 cm) number index (3.0 fish/tow) was the lowest we 
have observed and interestingly follows 1981 surveys in which yearlings (< 14 cm) 
had been very abundant. The current low adult scup abundance may be partly 
explained by the colder bottom water temperatures. 

As in 1981, YOY cod of the Georges Bank stock were ubiquitously distributed 
from Provincetown to Buzzards Bay, although our total catch was less than one- 
half of the previous year. It is premature to suggest what these observations 
indicate for the Georges Bank cod stock. DMF personnel recently noted that spring 
survey catches of 4-7 cm brit Atlantic herring in Buzzards Bay did serve as a 
harbinger of relatively large intertidal sampling catches of brit in southern 
Cape Cod estuaries one month later (Howe et. al 1983). 

AUTUMN CRUISE #8292 

In general, abundance for many commercially important groundfish was higher 
than in 1981, and for some species a two- to three-year downward trend was 
reversed. Recent autumn survey declines in abundance indices have paralleled a 
1980-81 rise in bottom water temperature. In autumn 1982, the average coast- 
wide bottom temperature declined 2.1° C: 



AUTUMN 



Average Temperature (°C) Average Salinity (°/oo) 





Cruise Dates 


Surface 


Bottom 


Surface 


1978 


5 Sep- 2 Oct 


16.1 


12.8 


31.8 


1979 


11 Sep- 4 Oct 


15.3 


12.6 


31.5 


1980 


8 Sep-29 Sep 


17.8 


14.3 


31.8 


1981 


14 Sep- 5 Oct 


16.4 


15.4 


31.7 


1982 


8 Sep-27 Sep 


17.0 


13.3 


32.5 



Moreover, north of Cape Cod it had fallen 2.7°C from the previous year (Figure 2), 

In coastal Gulf of Maine waters, young-of-the-year (YOY) haddock appeared 
in numbers comparable to 1979 and 1980 fall cruises. The 1982 cohort was more 
than twice as abundant as either of these two year-classes in region 5. 
Although age 1 haddock were caught in both 1980 and 1981, no yearlings were found 
in either the spring or autumn 1982 survey cruise, which confirms the weakness 
of the 1981 cohort. 

Atlantic cod YOY were about three times more plentiful than in 1981; 
however, they were taken in moderate numbers at only two stations, making it 
difficult to assess relative year-class strength. Thirty-one percent fewer YOY 
and juvenile cod were taken in regions 4 and 5. 

Not surprisingly, the temperature-sensitive flounders were more abundant 
than in 1981. On a coastwide basis, biomass increased 53% for yellowtail 
flounder, 106% for winter flounder, 57% for American plaice, and 218% for witch 
flounder. In opposition to the upward trend, white and red hake each declined 
by about 40% in biomass; the autumn decrease for red hake was the first we have 
observed. 

Unlike the two previous fall cruises when the surveys had apparently 
preceded the inshore arrival of Atlantic herring stocks, in 1982 we caught fair 
numbers of juveniles, primarily in Cape Cod Bay (weight and number increased 
78% and 260%, respectively). This was the first autumn survey since 1978 in 
which age 1 fish (modal size = 10 cm) were encountered. The 1978 survey catches 
also followed our first significant seine hauls of brit herring during June and 
July in southern Cape Cod estuaries (Waring and Howe 1978). The 1982 seine 
survey observations and bottom trawl survey information suggest that brit 
encountered in southern estuaries probably remain in nearshore water, moving 
into Cape Cod Bay no later than September. 

After nearly disappearing from survey catches in 1981, rock crabs showed 
an eight-fold increase in number, returning to catch levels noted in 1978-80. 
American lobster biomass remained about the same as in 1980-81. 



Principally found east of Cape Cod in September, spiny dogfish were taken 
in the greatest quantities since 1978 (360.28 kg/tow). Sand lance and winter 



skate (155. 64 kg/tow) were also especially plentiful. Mainly on the strength 
of one 30,389 sand lance catch, abundance indices rose to a timeseries high. 
Coastwide, northern searobin, windowpane, and little skate biomasses were 125%, 
84%, and 50% greater, respectively, than in 1981. 

Young-of-the-year of dominant warm-temperate and mid-Atlantic species 
were taken in larger numbers than in 1981. The prerecruit index (number per 
tow at age 0) for scup from the 1982 autumn survey (1,997.8) increased 125% 
over the 1981 index (871.4); the butterfish index increased 108% (75.7 to 157.6); 
the longfin squid ( Loligo ) index increased 158% (248.1 to 640.0); and the black sea 
bass index showed a six- fold increase (34.3 to 216.7). Except for a higher 
butterfish prerecruit index recorded in 1980, these were the strongest indicators 
of production increases noted to date. As observed during the spring cruise, 
catches of adult scup remained at their lowest level in five years. 

Survey data has documented the resurgence of the summer flounder stock 
since young fish were first noted in spring, 1980. For the third consecutive 
year, fall survey catches were higher than the previous year (biomass up 116% 
from 1981). Distribution and abundance were somewhat abnormal in that one- 
third of the catch occurred in Cape Cod Bay; however, this was expected because 
of an indication from the spring survey that an unusual number of fluke appeared 
to be heading north around Cape Cod. 

Another species displaying somewhat atypical distribution and abundance 
was silver hake. Though the coastwide biomass index was lower by 46% due to a 
decline in weight-per-tow north of Cape Cod (Gulf of Maine stock), the coast- 
wide number index increased 54% because of the highest catches of Y0Y we have 
observed in regions 1-3. In light of ongoing stock discrimination studies in 
the Georges Bank/Middle Atlantic area, the 1982 year-class will be particularly 
interesting to follow when it recruits to the fishery. 



YELLOWTAIL FLOUNDER 

The most important commercial flatfish taken in seasonal catches north 
and east of Cape Cod, yellowtail flounder are infrequently caught within state 
territorial waters off southern Massachusetts. Those taken within the "Cape 
Cod ground", which extends from the eastern shore of Cape Cod to around Cape 
Ann (9-64 m) constitute a distinguishable, though not completely discrete 
group (Lux 1963). Cape Cod ground yellowtail flounder are considered together 
with groups on Southern New England and Middle Atlantic offshore grounds as one 
management unit (West of 69° W). 

Unpublished tagging data indicate limited northward migration within the 
Cape Cod ground (F.E. Lux, personnel communication, 1975); however, movements 
are thought to be relatively localized and mainly offshore/onshore in response 
to vernal warming and autumnal cooling, respectively. Movements and aggregations 
may also be prompted by food supply or spawning, which peaks in June (Scott 1954). 



^■^■■fl 



In May, we find commercially fishable concentrations in all depth zones 
of region 5 and in depths > 18 m in regions 3 and 4; a general distributional 
shift shoalward occurred in the latter regions in 1981 and cannot be explained 
by seasonal temperature variation. By September, yellowtail are usually con- 
centrated at depths greater than 28 m in region 3 and between 18 and 37 m in 
regions 4 and 5. Yellowtail flounder occur when spring and autumn bottom 
temperatures range from M— 12°C and 7-15°C, respectively, and seem to prefer 
temperatures between H-8°C in spring and 7-11° C in autumn. 

Most of the survey catch is represented by age groups 1-3, as identified 
by length- frequency modes (Figure 3). For the spring cruises, consistent modes 
at approximately 24 cm and 36 cm correspond to ages 2 and 3. A minor mode at 11 
cm represents age 1 fish. In contrast, autumn length-frequencies show major 
modes at approximately 19 cm and 29 cm, corresponding to one-and two-year-olds 
(Lux and Nichy 1969). Clearly, autumn catches when compared to spring's yield 
more yearling fish and fewer age 3 or older fish. We believe that the loss of 
age 3 and older fish can be attributed to a combination of seasonal offshore 
movement and fishing mortality, as this age group is almost completely recruited 
to the spring fishery. Because age-group 1 fish compose only a minor component 
of spring catches, and 10-15 cm flatfish (e.g., winter flounder and American 
plaice) have always proven vulnerable to our survey trawl, we conclude that sub- 
stantial numbers of yearling yellowtail flounder move shoalward into state 
territorial waters annually between May and September. Age 1 fish are common 
in water as shoal as 18 m in autumn. A seasonal dispersion inshore of prerecruit 
fish has not been described in published scientific literature. It is a pos- 
sible explanation of why some yellowtail flounder inhabiting only the Cape Cod 
ground are infected by "black spot" ( Cryptocotyle lingua ) , a parasitic trematode 
shed by periwinkles living close to shore (Lux 1963). 

Because yellowtail flounder do not enter the. commercial catch until age 
2, the September research catch of 1-year-olds provides an estimate of relative 
abundance of prerecruits and an indication of year-class strength. From an 
age-length key compiled from over 600 age 1 and 2 yellowtail flounder sampled 
over the first seven cruises, we established the respective length ranges shown 
in Table 4 and derived corresponding catch-per-tow-at-age data. The autumn 
survey indices provide the basis for our tentative conclusions: the 1978 and 
1979 year-classes were very strong; the 1977 and 1981 year-classes were fair; 
and the 1980 year-class was poor. 

The possibility that the seasonal influx of one-year-olds is temperature- 
related and that we may have surveyed prior to their complete inshore re- location 
thereby misjudging year-class strength cannot be discounted. So far, the 
evidence is inconclusive. For instance, the 1977 year class, assessed as "fair" 
in autumn, 1978 also appeared to be of similar strength from spring and autumn 
1979 data (Figure 3). Yearlings of the 1980 cohort were "poorly" represented 
in autumn, 1981, when mean bottom water temperatures in regions 3-5 were at a 
five-year high (Figure 2). The subsequent spring survey catch indicated com- 
parable weakness for the two-year-olds; however, in autumn, 1982, they showed 
the highest modal length percentage observed to date, thereby confounding the 
assessment for this cohort. The 1981 cohort cannot be reassessed until the 1983 
data is finalized. 



Because yellowtail flounder biomass is higher in our spring survey, the 
May cruise offers the best measure of relative changes in abundance on the Cape 
Cod ground (Figure 4). From 1978 through 1980, the cruise biomass index 
fluctuated between 6.01 and 6.90 kg/tow. The index rose to 9.81 kg/tow in 1981 
but one year later, declined to 7.72 kg/tow. Although both 1978 and 1979 year- 
classes were very strong as prerecruits, the distinct upturn in biomass in 
spring, 1981 appears to be mainly attributable to the 1979 year-class (Figure 3). 

We believe that the very strong 1978 year-class was excessively cropped 
as two-year-olds before the spring, 1980 survey commenced. This possibility is 
supported by the following information. The yellowtail flounder resource and 
fishery for the 1979-80 fishing year (beginning October 1, 1979) was managed 
under an increasingly complicated management regime involving quarterly quotas, 
vessel class allocations, trip limits, etc. As described by Pierce (1982), 
the regulations encouraged an early harvest of recruiting, largely immature 
fish, which made up a considerable portion of the available stock on the grounds. 
By the end of the first quarter of the fishing year, 3,378 MT or two-thirds of 
annual optimum yield for the management unit (West of 69°W) was caught. On the 
Cape Cod ground, 1980 fishing effort increased 25% from the previous historical 
high of 1979 and landings reached an all-time high (McBride and Clark 1983). 
It also should be noted that our survey length-frequencies show a reduction of 
fish over 40 cm (age group 4 and older) after 1980 which may be an indication 
of increased fishing mortality. 

Following the rapid depletion of the 1978 cohort during 1980, the equally 
strong 1979 year-class was dominant in 1981 and because of an apparently weak 
1980 cohort, largely sustained the fishery through spring, 1982 (Figure 3), 
These research vessel observations show that during a period of increased effort, 
with landings above historical levels, the Cape Cod ground fishery became 
principally dependent upon the size of the recruiting year-class. 



WINTER FLOUNDER 

Winter flounder (blackback) have always been important to Massachusetts 
marine interests. Historically, local ports contribute 75% of annual U,S, com- 
mercial landings and a major portion of the northeast coast's recreational 
catch occurs in state waters (45% in 1979 NMFS Recreational Survey). 

The winter flounder's breeding biology and the behavior and distribution 
of larvae and juveniles affects formation of local population units along the 
coast. Defined "groups" consist of an assemblage of adjacent estuarine spawning 
units (Pierce and Howe 1977). By inhabiting distinctive areas in passing from 
larval to adult phase, each group's offspring are subjected to different environ- 
mental conditions and local fishing pressure. The relative geographic isolation 
of groups partly explains variable growth and exploitation rates reported in the 
scientific literature and provided the basis that management regulations should 
be of a local nature (Perlmutter 1946). However, this parochial viewpoint has 
contributed to deferring management responsibility because the blackback 
resource and fishery overlaps jurisdictional boundaries. Progressive initiatives 
have also been thwarted because winter flounder, although an integral component 
of mixed trawl fisheries, are usually of secondary importance to cod, haddock, 
or yellowtail flounder in commercial catches as well as in management priority. 



8 



The New England Fishery Management Council is now placing this species in the 
developing multispecies Atlantic Demersal Finfish Plan. 

In this section, we review DMF survey data from both a regional and 
coastwide perspective in order to provide additional insight to State and 
Federal managers. The survey's regional (strata set) bounds conform to tradi- 
tional inshore fishing practices, state trawling regulations, and in the case 
of the boundary at the tip of the Cape Cod peninsula (separating regions 3 and 
4), to a line of demarcation between major, inshore winter flounder population 
groups (Lux et al. 1970; Pierce and Howe 1977). 

In May, winter flounder are taken in nearly every survey tow but are 
most common in depths < 27 m. Over the spring timeseries, biomass indices 
have been highest in region 4 (20.11 kg/tow), followed by region 1 (19.40 kg/tow), 
region 2 (17.88 kg/tow), region 5 (17.28 kg/tow) and region 3 (10.57 kg/tow). 
Overall, 24% of spring-caught fish were of commercial size (> 32 cm). The 
breakdown by region is as follows: region 3, 44%; region 2, 38%; region 4, 25%; 
region 1, 24%; and region 5, 19%. These percentages reflect the seasonal move- 
ment of assemblages of fish, specifically, the local extent to which mature and 
immature flounder had dispersed from estuarine spawning and nursery grounds to 
coastal water. Size-dependent differences in bathymetric distribution were not 
evident from spring survey data. 

Autumn indices of abundance show the extent of migration differences 
between area assemblages. There were consistent regional biomass declines 
from spring south of Cape Cod, 96% in region 1 (0.75 kg/tow) and 98% in region 2 
(0.44 kg/tow). This indicates that mature fish had not returned inshore from 
summer, offshore areas (Howe and Coates 1975). Juveniles, more tolerent of 
high temperatures than older fish (Huntsman and Sparks 1924), remain abundant 
in local estuaries (Howe et al. 1976) where September water temperatures are 
*v* 23°C, but were not usually found in any abundance in deeper coastal water 
O 16-20°C; Figure 2). 

Region 3, despite a 55% drop in biomass (5.07 kg/tow), was the only 
coastal area where the percentage of autumn-caught fish larger than 32 cm C44%) 
was the same as during spring. This suggests that adults and juveniles begin 
returning inshore earlier or inhabit the coastal water during summer months to 
a greater extent than is apparent south of Cape Cod. 

Autumn changes in abundance were substantially different north of Cape 
Cod; declines in biomass were only 3% in region 4 (19.50 kg/tow) and 5% in 
region 5 (16.44 kg/tow) but blackback larger than 32 cm constituted just 9% and 
14% of region 4 and 5 catches, respectively. Here, a reduced population of 
adult fish was augmented by juveniles moving deeper from estuarine habitat. 
The adult emigration was particularly evident from tag returns outside territorial 
waters north of Cape Ann (Howe and Coates 1975). The movement of juveniles was 
pronounced in survey catch length- frequencies from the shoalest sampling strata 
C< 9 m). For most autumn surveys, flounder have been concentrated at < 9 m in 
Massachusetts Bay and 18-27 m depths in Cape Cod Bay. In 1980, when mean bottom 



temperatures were highest in the timeseries (Figure 2), blackback moved to 
deeper (cooler) sampling strata in both regions. Rarely have winter flounder 
been taken in fall tows where bottom temperatures were over 14°C; greatest 
catches occurred from 8.8-13.0°C. This information is consistent with coast- 
wide tagging results which indicated that the average distance travelled during 
the seaward migration was related to the proximity of bottom water of less than 
15°C (Howe and Coates 1975). 

Because winter flounder may still be offshore in autumn, spring abundance 
indices are more valuable for indicating changes in abundance. The spring 
indices coastwide have displayed a downward trend (Figure 5), except for the 
1981 upturn, which was a multispecies phenomenon seemingly related to changes in 
availability (Howe et al. 1983). From 1978 to 1982, the weight and number 
indices declined 21%, i.e., from 18.70 kg/tow and 62.74 fish/tow to 14.76 kg/tow 
and 49.54 fish/tow. 

Spring indices and 95% confidence intervals are presented by region in 
Figure 6 from which several conclusions can be drawn. First, abundance has 
remained unchanged in region 1. Second, an upward trend was evident in regions 
3 and 5 until 1982; however, broadening confidence intervals since 1981 have 
reduced the reliability of both the 1981 and 1982 estimates. Third, there has 
been a 66% decline in biomass in region 2 since 1978. Finally, in 1982, a 56% 
decline in biomass occurred in region 4; non-overlapping confidence intervals 
for this estimate, compared with 1981, indicate a statistically significant 
decline unrelated to sampling variability. 

Trends in prerecruit indices track the relative abundance of fish which 
will become vulnerable to commercial gear in the following seasons. A summation 
of stratified mean numbers per tow of all individuals less than 27 cm serves 
as a convenient measure of potential recruitment (Lange and Lux 1978). Prerecruit 
and total number indices (all sizes) are presented for all spring cruises in 
Table 5. From 1978 to 1980, the prerecruit index moved upward in region 3 and 5 
and downward in regions 1, 2, and 4. In 1981, indices increased an average of 
44% with all areas, except region 3, showing elevated numbers of prerecruits. 
The following spring, prerecruit indices declined by an average of 28%; this 
decrease occurred in all regions. The coastwide prerecruit index has declined 
37% from 1978 (41.2 fish/tow) to 1982 (26.1 fish/tow). 

Abundance indices for prerecruit and all size fish indicate that the upturn 
noted for winter flounder in 1981 occurred only for prerecruits south of Cape 
Cod and was greater for larger fish (> 27 cm) east and north of Cape Cod, though 
prerecruits were also more abundant in region 4 and 5 than in 1980. This 
general increase in prerecruit indices may have been due to more stressful 1980- 
81 winter conditions nearshore, thereby enhancing seaward movement, or a real 
increase in year-class abundance; however, percent length-composition information, 
which is described below, does not support the latter hypothesis. 

Interpretation of winter flounder seasonal length-frequencies is difficult 
because of the wide variation in average length of a year-class CPearcy 1962) 
and variable growth rates between areas and sexes which result in significant 



10 



growth differences between inshore population groups (Howe and Coates 1975). 
A composite age-length relationship (sexes combined) representative of the 
Massachusetts coastwide catch does not presently exist. Previous growth equa- 
tions have been derived by sex and for specific geographic areas. 

Spring and autumn length- frequencies are polymodal with the latter more 
truncated at the upper size range (Figure 7). Discernible spring modal peaks 
at about 12, 20, and 30 cm, as well as autumn peaks at 10, 18, and 27 cm, 
probably correspond to ages 1-3. This apparent length-at-age discrepancy may 
be due to the nature of the recruitment process, which involves both movement 
onto the inshore grounds and an increase in vulnerability to commercial fishing 
gear over a range of sizes and ages. Because faster-growing winter flounder 
recruit earlier than slower-growing individuals (Berry et al. 1965), modes 
must reflect predominance of fast-growing fish in spring and slower-growing 
individuals in autumn. 

Also evident from Figure 7 is that the 1977 year-class , first appearing 
at age 1 in 1978, was the only cohort of above-average abundance in the time- 
series. While other year-classes were similar in relative strength at ages 2 
and 3 (i.e., percent of catch, spring), this one showed the greatest strength 
at ages 4 and older (> 32 cm in spring, 1981 and 1982). Furthermore, abundance 
of its apparent slow-growers in autumn, 1978, was also uniquely high. We con- 
clude that an expectation of good recruitment follows from a strong spring peak 
of one-year-olds probably succeeded by a strong 6-12 cm mode in autumn length- 
frequencies . 

Length- frequency distributions also demonstrate the general tendency for 
year-classes to show a higher percent of catch-at-length up to age 3, the 
generally accepted mean age at recruitment. Incomplete recruitment may extend 
through age M- (Howe et al. 1976), which has an important biological implication. 
The broad age range of recruiting individuals provides stability in the recruit- 
ing population, lessening the magnitude of a stock reduction in the event of one 
or more weak cohorts. 

Mesh size of fishing nets, market preferences and culling practices, and 
seasonal openings and closures of inshore trawling grounds are also important 
determinants to winter flounder recruitment and yield. It is apparent from 
codend mesh selectivity trials, cull simulation studies, and the availability 
of prerecruit-sized fish as indicated by inshore survey data, that over the years, 
traditionally-sized codends (3.9-5.2") and areal/seasonal regulations have 
resulted in the capture and loss due to discard of significant numbers of fish 
from 15 cm (6") to whatever cull size is in vogue (Smolowitz et al. 1978; 
Mayo et al. 1981; Anderson et al 1983). Exploitation of immature fish may be 
undercutting some of the natural resiliency of the winter flounder population. 

A yield-per-recruit analysis, representative of the coastwide winter 
flounder groups, has not been developed. A major difficulty is determining an 
accurate rate of growth. If this were possible, it would undoubtedly indicate 
that blackback are caught before they grow to an age/size where biomass (yield) 
is maximized. 



11 



SUMMER FLOUNDER 

Summer flounder (fluke) enter southern Massachusetts waters in May and 
generally leave inshore areas by October; during the summer months they are 
sought by both recreational and commercial fishermen. 

In May, summer flounder distribution has been generally confined to samp- 
ling regions south and east of Cape Cod and depths _< 27 m. By September, they 
are commonly taken in depths < 9.3 m in Cape Cod Bay as well. Spring catch- 
per-tow indices east of Cape Cod and autumn indices in Cape Cod Bay were higher 
in 1981 and especially in 1982 than during prior years. 

Our summer flounder catch consists almost entirely of age 3 and older 
(> 33 cm) fish which differs substantially from the size (age) distribution of 
most other species we monitor. Juvenile fluke are primarily found in estuaries 
and embayments between North Carolina and New Jersey. From 1978 to 1980, total 
spring catch-per-tow indices declined from 1.17 to 0.36 fish/tow (Figure 8) 
with modal peaks in catch length-frequencies between M-2 cm and 59 cm (Figure 9). 
In 1981, as a result of a significant influx of 2-year-olds (1979 year-class) 
and more 3-year-olds, the catch index increased to 1.19 fish/tow. Driven by 
the relative strength of the 1979 cohort, the 1982 index reached 2.03 fish/tow. 

Autumn abundance indices followed the spring pattern with a 1982 high of 
1.75 fish/tow. Fall survey catches have been consistently lower than spring 
catches and, until the 1979 cohort appeared in 1981, the size range was more 
restricted. The seasonal constriction in length range reflects relatively fast 
growth of 3-year-old fish and more widespread fish distribution. The absence 
of large adults in autumn catches may also be related to the offshore migration 
and coincident spawning season which are underway by September, plus the effect 
of intense summer fishing mortality. 

Although the 1981 and 1982 spring length-frequencies indicate fairly good 
recruitment, at the same time there has been a noticeable decrease of fluke over 
50 cm. This decline may indicate growth overfishing as demonstrated by yield- 
per-recruit analysis (Fogarty 1981). 



SCUP 

An important foodfish to draggermen, trap fishermen, and sportsfishermen, 
scup is one of the most abundant species caught in the inshore survey. In May, 
scup congregate in the shoal waters ( < 9 m) of regions 1 and 2, where bottom 
water temperatures are always highest. Until 1981, spring catches consisted 
largely of adult scup approaching spawning condition (age 2 and older). Since 
then, yearlings have been more abundant. 

From 1978 to 1980, the spring survey weight index fluctuated between 9.63 
and 22.95 kg/tow (Figure 10). Five length- frequency modes (12, 18, 24, 26, and 
29 cm) were discernible from 1978-80 catches and correspond to age groups 1-5 
(Pierce 1981) (Figure 11). In 1981, the weight index declined 59% from 1980 
while the number index increased 50%. These changes were attributable to a 



12 



16- fold increase in yearlings over the prior /ear. Two-year-olds were the only 
other age group caught in 1981, unlike the previous three years. In 1982, the 
weight index plunged to 0.53 kg/tow and again, scup lengths were bimodal. 

Because scup are thought not to be as available and vulnerable to bottom 
trawls as flounders and other groundfish (Edwards 1968), caution must be 
exercised in interpreting catch data from trawl surveys. For example, one 
catch weighing over 1,500 kg is not unusual during our spring survey but more 
than one would inflate the abundance index. Conversely, because no unusually 
large single catch was made in 1982, we cannot be certain that scup were really 
less abundant or that more age groups were not present inshore during the survey 
period. 

We suspect that the distinct change in 1982 weight indices and shifts in 
length composition modality since 1981 are related to water temperature. Mean 
bottom temperatures in regions 1 and 2 were lower in both May periods than dur- 
ing 1978-80 (Figure 2) so it is possible that the inshore arrival of adult scup 
was delayed. Mayo (1982) has presented information showing that the scup pop- 
ulation's center of abundance shifted northward from the late 1960 T s to the mid- 
1970 's in response to a warming trend in the Middle Atlantic Bight, but after 1977 
a cooling trend may again be effectively restricting wintering grounds to farther 
south. If this is the case, the migration pattern and arrival time in southern 
Massachusetts waters may be changing. 

Summer-spawned young-of-the-year (Y0Y) comprise over 90% of the autumn survey 
catch of scup by number (Figure 11). Although yearling and adult scup are also 
caught, the latter multi-age grouping could not be plotted on Figure 11 because of 
the dominance of 0-group fish. Young-of-the-year are distributed over all depth 
intervals in regions 1-2 but are confined to depths < 27 m in region 3 and 4. 
They are usually most abundant in region 1 (1000+/tow) and least abundant in region 4 
(10+/tow). No scup have been taken within region 5 in the survey timeseries. 

The magnitude of autumn abundance indices suggests that prerecruit indices 
(number per tow _< 12 cm) might provide information on relative strength of 
recruiting year-classes. Toward that goal, spring and autumn length- frequencies 
were separated into appropriate length ranges corresponding to age groupings, 
and stratified mean number-at-length per tow was summed to provide indices of 
abundance. As shown in Table 6, there has been little apparent relationship 
between numbers of autumn-caught YOY and the following year's catch of one-year- 
olds, irrespective of season taken, or between autumn-caught one-year-olds and the 
following year's spring-caught adults. Relatively high YOY abundance in 1978 did 
match the comparatively strong showing of adults 20 months later (spring, 1980); 
however, the relationship was inconsistent with respect to recruitment from the 
following two year-classes. This may be due to inherent variability of populations 
changing at the extremity of their range or environmental conditions which altered 
the timing of the spring scup migration. Accordingly, a comparison between Massa- 
chusetts YOY indices with catch per unit effort indices for the southern New 
England trawl fisheries could be valuable over a longer timeseries. 



13 



LONGFIN SQUI7; 

The longfin or bone squid, Loligo pealei , is a very important species in 
the marine food web. It is productive, rapid growing, short-lived, and conse- 
quently prone to drastic changes in abundance. Loligo is also of increasing 
importance to commercial fisheries due to opportunities presented by federal 
waters joint ventures and state internal waters over-the-side sales. These 
opportunities are attributable, in part, to reductions in foreign fleet allo- 
cations . 

After overwintering offshore, Loligo migrate into shallow, inshore waters 
from Chesapeake Bay to Cape Cod to spawn from late April through September. 
Upon their arrival in shallow, southern Massachusetts waters (depths < 18 m),an 
intense trawl fishery targets on spawning adults. These sexually mature 
individuals (> 15 cm) dominate commercial trawl catches until about mid-May 
when smaller, maturing squid constitute the greatest portion of both commercial 
and survey trawl catches. Immature squid (generally 2-7 cm) appear in research 
catches by mid-May. 

j 

Our spring survey catch-per-tow indices have been greatest in region 2 
where the highest percentage of large spawners (> 20 cm) are normally taken. 
Usually, squid of this size have been less abundant in region 1 and least 
abundant in region 3. In each region, smaller-sized individuals are present in 
greater numbers. 

Autumn distribution and abundance differ markedly from spring. Age 0-group 
squid abound and are ubiquitously distributed both north and south of Cape Cod. 
Catch-per-tow has in one year or another been highest in every region except 
region 5, where lowest numbers are usually found. Modal length values of the 
September catch are lowest in regions 1-3 (2-3 cm) and highest north of Cape 
Cod (4-6 cm), suggesting a northerly movement of some early-hatched young. A 
general absence of squid larger than about 20 cm is probably an indication of 
high post-spawning mortality and/or an offshore movement of survivors. 

Loligo have two overlapping reproductive cycles, one procreating the other; 
therefore, the cycles are considered crossed. As described by Mesnil (1977), 
one cycle is of 14 months' duration from a June hatch (spring brood). This 
cohort begins maturing during the winter and spawns the following summer. The 
progeny (the late summer brood) have a 20-month cycle from an August hatch. 
Immature until their second winter offshore, they spawn the following spring. 

The late-hatched brood consistently appears as a 2-4 cm mode in our autumn 
survey length- frequencies and again the following spring as a 4-5 cm mode 
(Figure 12). Because these modes occur at a smaller mantle length than reported 
by Mesnil (1977), we believe that in Massachusetts inshore waters late spawning 
peaks in September rather than in August. Egg clusters or mops are frequently found 
in the trawl in our September surveys; therefore, a September-October hatch is 
presumed . 



14 



Twenty months later, the late cohort spawns in spring as large individuals, 
While no mode is apparent in our length- frequencies for these squid, they would 
approximate 18 to 30 cm in mantle length (Mesnil 1977). 

The most important mode in May length- frequencies, shifting between 12 
and 18 cm, represents the previous year's spring (June) hatch. The more 
variable positioning of this mode is probably related to the prolonged early 
spawning period. During the previous September, this cohort is also represented 
by the descending right tail of the autumn length- frequencies (6^12 cm). 

Because of space limitations on Figure 12, mature squid > 30 cm are not 
shown. They are considered by Mesnil (1977) to be the remnants of a spring 
cohort, thus they have survived two winters. Squid over 30 cm have always made 
up from 3-6% of individuals taken in the spring cruise timeseries. It is not 
known whether they spawn in their first season (Tibbetts 1977). 

The changing proportionality of the three principal cohorts evident in 
May length-frequencies has significantly influenced recent trends in Loligo 
abundance for Massachusetts waters (Figure 13). In order to describe this 
phenomenon, spring survey size ranges of each cohort were approximated, i.e., 
small squid, < 9 cm (late brood or 8-mo-olds); maturing squid, 10-19 cm (spring 
brood or 11-mo-olds); and, spring spawners, 20-29 cm (late brood or 20-mo-olds). 
For each cruise, percent size composition was derived by summing stratified mean 
number (at length) per tow. 

Since 1978, the medium-sized maturing squid have composed the largest 
percentage of our spring survey catch (33-67% of the individuals) which is in 
agreement with Summers ' (1971) observations; however, from 1978-80, progeny 
(the < 9 cm squid) were of diminishing importance, composing 23%, 19% and 8%, 
respectively, of individuals in spring catches. Late broods also did not appear 
imposing in our autumn 1980 and 1981 prerecruit indices (stratified mean number/ 
tow _< 8 cm), which were the lowest in the timeseries (Table 7). Perhaps because 
later- than-usual spawning and hatching occurred (that our September surveys did 
not detect) and/or winter survival was exceptional, these late cohorts proved to 
be the most sizeable of the timeseries, as evidenced by large numbers of small 
squid in 1981-82 spring surveys (41% and 31% of individuals, respectively). 

Both the 1980 and 1981 late cohorts were destined to contribute strongly 
to the exceptional abundance level observed inshore in spring, 1983. Although 
our final 1983 data is not available, the preliminary number index increased 
five- fold over 1982. Massachusetts commercial landings of Loligo increased 
from 480 MT in 1982 to 2,683 MT in 1983. Twenty months after the squid of the 
1980 late cohort hatched, they became the large (20-29 cm) spring spawners of 
1982 that produced what must have been a strong spring cohort of squid, i.e., 
10^19 cm individuals by May, 1983. Twenty months after the 1981 late cohort 
hatched, it also arrived in southern Massachusetts in strong numbers as 20-29 
cm spawners. Preliminary 1983 length-frequency data also indicates greater 
carryover of squid > 30 cm which would be survivors of the 1982 late spawning 
group. 



15 



There were other early indicators of an upturn in squid abundance. The 
1982 NEFC autumn prerecruit index was 56% and 9% greater than the 1981 and 
1967-81 mean indices, respectively. Based on offshore abundance of prerecruit - 
sized squid and indications from the domestic fishery that peak spawning may 
have occurred later than usual, it was hypothesized that the small squid would 
not be susceptible to the winter 1982-83 foreign fishery and, therefore, a 
relatively high catch in 1983 was predicted when this cohort entered the catch 
in June (Lange 1982). In addition, our 1982 autumn prerecruit index was the 
highest in the timeseries, 158% higher than in 1981 and 88% greater than the 
previous four-year average (Table 7). The contribution of the 1982 late cohort, 
in particular, appears to have been substantial as not6d in the autumn length- 
frequency. This might augur well for the spring, 1984 fishery when this cohort 
returns as large , spring spawners . 

It has been stated that major obstacles to better management of Loligo 
include lack of insight on the nature of stock-recruitment relationships and 
inadequate knowledge of the numbers of squid recruited annually (Sissenwine and 
Tibbetts 1977). The Massachusetts DMF survey data indicate that strong recruit- 
ment to the 1983 inshore fishery hinged mainly on the simultaneous occurrence 
of two strong cohorts; moreover, the stock size of both 1981 late spawners 
(33% of individuals in May catch) and 1982 spring spawners (13% of individuals), 
were about the weakest in the timeseries. The implication is that recruitment 
appears to have been relatively independent of stock size. This empirical 
information corroborates the most prudent scientific assumption on the stock- 
recruitment relationship of Loligo pealei (Sissenwine and Tibbetts 1977; Lange 
and Sissenwine 1980). 

No significant correlation has been found between offshore autumn indices 
of prerecruit (_< 8 cm) squid from the NEFC bottom trawl surveys and commercial 
catches (Lange and Sissenwine 1980). The DMF autumn indices, mostly reflecting 
annual production in a principal spawning/nursey area, should complement offshore 
indices. Though the timeseries is short, there appears to be a relationship 
between prerecruits seen in our September catch and survey catch of all-size 
squid the following May. Furthermore, the trend for these prerecruit indices 
mirrors that of annual Massachusetts commercial landings which occur mainly in 
spring (Figure 14). These predictive possibilities offer additional evidence 
that the Massachusetts inshore survey can enhance understanding of the relation- 
ship between Loligo stock and recruitment. 



OVERVIEW 

The implementation of the Magnuson Fishery Conservation and Management Act 
of 1976 made management authorities, scientists, and fishermen more conscious of 
gaps in knowledge of fishery resources , particularly those extending into unsurveyed 
inshore areas. Massachusetts coastal waters had long been recognized as important 
to the productivity of fishery resources but were only qualitatively described. 
The DMF bottom trawl survey program was initiated in 1978 to supply this needed 



16 



information for state waters, thereby augmenting and improving the scientific 
basis for management. With the completion of each semiannual survey cruise, 
and as our reported observations became independently corroborated or other- 
wise stood the test of time, the survey has become increasingly relied upon 
for information on current and future conditions of the stocks. 

By describing recent trends in species abundance, distribution, and size 
composition, such as for the five species reported herein, cruise results have 
enabled the DMF to make management decisions as well as evaluate effects of 
coastal zone activities (e.g., dredge spoil disposal; Howe and Germano 1982). 
Just as importantly, by 1980, NMFS assessment scientists began using DMF survey 
information in their annual updates on status of the stocks. Now, stock 
assessments for at least eight species, including cod, haddock, yellowtail, 
flounder, and sea herring, utilize our survey data. In addition, from 1978-82, 
a total of 31,214 biological samples and observations from many species were 
collected for federal, state, and other affiliated researchers conducting wide- 
ranging assessment support activities and special ecological studies. Another 
22,24-8 specimens were examined for various fish diseases as part of a priority 
and cooperative initiative with NMFS to monitor fish health in Massachusetts 
waters . 

From a resource assessment standpoint, the Massachusetts inshore survey 
has become important for the information it provides on abundance of pre- 
exploitable fish, which can strongly influence nearterm changes in stock abund- 
ance. Moreover, consistently impressive catches of young fish have clearly 
shown the significance of Massachusetts waters as rearing grounds. The percentage 
of prerecruit-sized, spring-caught individuals in the study area for 23 
commercially valuable species from state territorial or contiguous waters is 
summarized in Table 8. Landings from commercial draggers are different because 
fishing is undertaken in a non-random manner, commercial nets are more selective 
than the research net, and fishermen cull or discard unwanted oomponents of the 
catch. Still, during the season when exploitable-sized groundfish are usually 
most abundant inshore and fishing is most intense, the survey data shows how 
available prerecruits are to capture and where they are most vulnerable to 
potential exploitation. This information offers fishery managers opportunities 
to better manage resources through revised areal/seasonal closures and mesh 
regulations. 

Along with providing insights on the stocks, the expanding timeseries has 
also increased our perception of annual differences in species' seasonal avail- 
ability and distribution. The major limitation of this survey is the narrow 
geographic scope of the inshore study area; it accentuates effects associated 
with environmental variation and spatial distribution of fish stocks, factors 
which constrain interpretation of changes in abundance. For instance, only a 
small portion of any population is ever available to our research trawl, and 
all species undergo some migration associated with seasonal environmental 
variation, which is greatest nearshore. Though some uncertainty will always 
exist, a more lengthy timeseries and more timely development and integration 
of inshore and offshore survey results will be helpful in evaluating, understand- 
ing, and predicting changes in stock abundance. 



17 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 

Efforts of the NMFS/URI Fisheries Engineering Group in converting the 
GLORIA MICHELLE into a very capable research vessel enabled the continuation 
of this program in 1982. Her crew, Lt. J.G. John Moakley (Captain), Lt. J.G. 
Gary Bulmer, and John Kenney, and fishermen of the F/V FRANCES ELIZABETH, 
David Arnold, Antone Pinto, and Daniel Arnold provided valuable advice, 
assistance, and inspiration when we could most use it. They deserve much 
credit for the successful completion of these cruises. 

The following personnel of the NEFC/Woods Hole Laboratory offered timely 
assistance, especially in resolving problems in data processing: Linda Despres- 
Patanjo, Malcolm Silverman, Loretta O'Brien, Donald Flescher, Philip Chase, 
Wayne Hoover, and Jim Sargent. 

We thank W. Leigh Bridges who administered the project and reviewed this 
report, and Director Philip Coates for his continuing support. We are also 
grateful to Frank Germano, a former member of this project, and 27 other 
Division employees whose on-board assistance and logistical support were helpful 
in 1982. 



REFERENCES 

Anderson, E.D., J.M. Mason, A.M.T. Lange, and C,J. Byrne. 1983. Codend mesh 
selectivity in the Long Island spring trawl fishery for summer flounder 
and associated species. NMFS, Northeast Fisheries Center, Woods Hole 
Laboratory. Laboratory Reference No. 83-33. 

Berry, R.J., S.B. Saila, and D.B. Horton. 1965. Growth studies of winter 
flounder, Pseudopleuronectes americanus (Walbaum), in Rhode Island. 
Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 94:259-264. 

Edwards, R.L. 1968. Fishery resources of the North Atlantic area. The Future 
of the Fishing Industry of the United States. Univ. of Washington Publ. 
in Fisheries, N.S. 4:52-60. 

Fogarty, M.J. 1981. Review and assessment of the summer flounder C Paralichthyg. 
dentatus ) fishery in the Northwest Atlantic. NMFS, Northeast Fisheries ' 
Center, Woods Hole Laboratory. Laboratory Reference No. 81-25. 

Howe, A.B. and P.G. Coates. 1975. Winter flounder movements, growth, and 
mortality off Massachusetts. Transactions of the American Fisheries 
Society 104:13-29. 

Howe, A.B., P.G. Coates, and D.E. Pierce. 1976. Winter flounder estuarine 
year-class abundance, mortality, and recruitment. Transactions of the 
American Fisheries Society 105:647-657. 



18 



Howe, A.B., T.P. Currier, and F.J. Germano, Jr. 1983. Occurrence of young- 
of-the-year Atlantic herring in southern Massachusetts estuaries — An 
update. Coastal Oceanography and Climatology News 5:34-35. 

Howe, A.B., T.P. Currier, S.L. Sass, and B.C. Kelly. 1983. Coastwide Fishery 
Resource Assessment. Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries. 

Howe, A.B. and F.G. Germano, Jr. 1982. Fisheries and environmental baselines 
relative to dredge spoil disposal, Cape Cod Bay, 1981. Massachusetts 
Division of Marine Fisheries #12954~43-100-9~82-CR. 

Huntsman, A.G. and M.I. Sparks. 1921. Limiting factors for marine animals. 

3. Relative resistance to high temperatures. Contributions to Canadian 
Biology, New Ser. 2:97-114. 

Lange, A.M.T. 1982. Status of the squid ( Loligo pealei and Illex illecebrosus ) 
populations off the northeastern USA. NMFS, Northeast Fisheries Center, 
Woods Hole Laboratory. Laboratory Reference No. 82-27. 

Lange, A.M.T. and F.E. Lux. 1978. Review of the other flounder stocks Cwinter 
flounder, American plaice, witch flounder, and windowpane flounder) off 
the Northeast United States, August 1978. NMFS, Northeast Fisheries 
Center, Woods Hole Laboratory. Laboratory Reference No. 78-44. 

Lange, A.M.T. and M.P. Sissenwine. 1980. Biological considerations relevant 

to the management of squid (Loligo pealei and Illex illecebrosus ) of the 
Northwest Atlantic. Marine Fisheries Review, July-August: 23-38. 

Lux, F.E. 1963. Identification of New England yellowtail flounder groups. 
Fishery Bulletin 63:1-10. 

Lux, F.E. and F.E. Nichy. 1969. Growth of yellowtail flounder, Limanda 

ferruginea (Storer), on three New England fishing grounds. Research 
Bulletin International Commission Northwest Atlantic Fisheries 6:5-25. 

Lux, F.E. A.E. Peterson, and R.F. Hutton. 1970. Geographical variation in 

fin ray number in winter flounder, Pseudopleuronectes americanus (Walbaum), 
off Massachusetts. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 
99-483-488. 

Mayo, R.K. 1982. An assessment of the scup Stenotomus chrysops (L.), population 
in the southern New England and Middle Atlantic regions. NMFS, Northeast 
Fisheries Center, Woods Hole Laboratory. Laboratory Reference No. 82-46. 

Mayo, R.K. , A.M. Lange, S.A. Murawski, M.P. Sissenwine, and B.E. Brown. 1981. 
Estimation of discards in mixed trawl fisheries off the Northeast coast 
of the United States, based on bottom trawl survey catches. NMFS, North- 
east Fisheries Center, Woods Hole laboratory. Laboratory Reference 
No. 81-18. 



19 



,1 



McBride, M.M. and S.H. Clark. 1983. Assessment status of yellowtail flounder 
( Limanda ferruginea ) stocks off the Northeast United States, 1983. 
NMFS, Northeast Fisheries Center, Woods Hole Laboratory. Laboratory 
Reference No. 83-32. 

Mesnil, B. 1977. Growth and life cycle of squid, Loligo pealei and Illex 
illecebrosus , from the Northwest Atlantic. International Commission 
Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Selected Papers 2:55-69. 

Pearcy, W.G. 1962. Ecology of an estuarine population of winter flounder 

Pseudopleuronectes americanus (Walbaum). Bulletin Bingham Oceanographic 
Collection, Yale University 18(1). 

Perlmutter, A. 1946. The distribution of the winter flounder ( Pseudopleuronectes 
americanus ) and its bearing on management possibilities. Transactions of 
the Eleventh North American Wildlife Conference for 1946:239-250. 

Pierce, D.E. 1981. Scup ( Stenotomus chrysops ) and its fisheries in Nantucket 
and Vineyard Sounds, Massachusetts. MS. Thesis. Southeastern Massachu- 
setts University. Dartmouth, MA. 

Pierce, D.E. 1982. Development and evolution of fishery management plans for 
cod, haddock, and yellowtail flounder. Massachusetts Division of Marine 
Fisheries. 

Pierce, D.E. and A.B. Howe. 1977. A further study on winter flounder group 

identification off Massachusetts. Transactions of the American Fisheries 
Society 106:131-139. 

Scott, D.M. 1954. A comparative study of the yellowtail flounder from three 

Atlantic fishing areas. Journal of the Fisheries Research Board of Canada 
11:171-197. 

Sissenwine, M.P. and A.E. Tibbetts. 1977. Simulating the effect of fishing on 
squid ( Loligo and Illex ) populations on the Northeastern United States. 
International Commission Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Selected Papers 
2:71-84. 















Smolowitz, R.J., R.S. Testaverde, and M. DiLiberti. 1978. New England mesh 

selectivity studies, experiment two, inshore groundfish. NMFS, Northeast 
Fisheries Center, Woods Hole Laboratory. Laboratory Reference No. 78-24. 

Summers, W.C. 1971. Age and growth of Loligo pealei , a population study of the 
common Atlantic coast squid. Biological Bulletin 141:189-201. 

Tibbetts, A.M. 1977. Squid fisheries ( Loligo pealei and Illex illecebrosus ) 
off the Northeastern coast of the United States of America, 1963-74. 
International Commission Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Selected Papers 
2:85-110. 

Waring, G.T. and A.B. Howe. 1979. Occurrence of young-of-the-year Atlantic 
herring in southern Massachusetts estuaries in summer 1978. Coastal 
Oceanography and Climatology News 1:17-18. 

20 



■Figure 1. 



Sampling strata used 
in Massachusetts D!-F 
inshore bottom travl 
survey. 




DEPTH STRATA (meters) 







9.1 - 18.3 

18.1 - 27.1 

27.5 - 36.6 

36.7-51.9 

^55,0 



REGIONS ( - Sm T* SETS) 

BHiWLl: strata 11 - II, 

BtfiifllL2: STRATA 15 - 16 

gESlQN 1: STRATA 17 - 21 

HUUflllJl: STRATA 25-30 

atfilQlL-S: STRATA 31 - 36 




Fig* 3. YELLOWTAIL length frequencies (percent at length) 

from spring and autumn inshore Mass. research surveys, 1978-1982. 




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from spring and autumn inshore Mass. research surveys, 1978-1982. 




10.0 



WEIGHT 



NUMBER 



8u-. 
7._ 



Figure 8 . Indices of abundance 

from spring ( ) and autumn 

( ) research vessel surveys 

for SUMMER FLOUNDER from 
Massachusetts inshore waters. 



1 






- H 




1978 



fig. 9 . SUMMER FLOUNDER length frequencies (percent at length) 
from spring and autumn inshore Mass. research surveys, 1978-1982. 







10,000 



WEIGHT 



NUMBER 



1_ :_! 



. 



100.0 



Figure 10. Indices of abundance 

from spring (- ) and autumn 

( ) research vessel surveys ■} 

for SCUP from Massachusetts 



inshore waters. 



r 





Fig. 11. SCUP length frequencies (percent at length) from 
spring and autumn inshore Mass. research surveys, 1978-1982. 



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10 



30 



50 



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H 



10 



30 



50 



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Fig. 12 . LOLIGO length frequencies (percent at length) 

from epring and autumn inshore Mass. research surveys, 1978-1982. 







tea 



1000,,.0_ 



WEIGHT 



NUMBER 



Figure 13. Indices of abundanoer 

from spring C ) and autumn 

( ) research vessel surveys 

for LONGFIN SQUID from Massa- 
chusetts inshore waters. 




FIGURE 14. 



Autumn DMF inshore bottom trawl survey prerecruit (58 cm) 
indices for Loligo pealei compared to subsequent spring 
number indices (all sizes) and Massachusetts commercial 
landings (— ) , 1978 - 1982. 



7CXH 



E 

500. 

00 

VI 



o 



m 
-|300- 

C 
C 

o ■ 

CO 

E 
1? 100' 



AUTUMN 






B78 



1979 



1980 



1981 



1982 



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v 

N 



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1978 



1979 



1980 



1981 



1982 



1983 



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WEIGHT 


























£ aKimdjn^i 






NUMBER 




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figure la . inQices oi a^unv. — v 

j from spring (— ) and autumn 

- ( ) research vessel surveys 

■ for ATLANTIC COD from Mas sa- 




■f-HH 




4 .- :-. - - . : 1 - 


7 


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WEIGHT 



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Figure 16. Indices of abundance. 

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100.0 



WEIGHT 



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1978 



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100.0 



WEIGHT 



NUMBER 



Figure 19. Indices of abundance g_ 

from spring ( ) and autumn 1; 

( ) research vessel surveys 

for WHITE HAKE from Massa- ' 
chusetts inshore waters. 




.J. 



1978 79 



1000.0 



WEIGHT 



NUMBER 



m. 



Figure 20. Indices of abundance 

from spring G ) and autumn 

( ) research vessel surveys 

for BLACK SEA BASS from 
Massachusetts inshore waters. 



• 




1978 79 



WEIGHT 



NUMBER 



10.0 



"1 
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1 




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from spring ( •) and autumn 

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10.0 



:_. | J Figure 28. Indicts of abundance 

i from spring ( ) and autumn 

i ( ) research vessel surveys 

- for ATLANTIC HERRING from Massa- 

3 chusetts inshore waters. 




1978 



79 



80 



81 



82 



1978 79 



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82 



1000.0 



WEIGHT 



NUMBER 



_ — Figure 29. Indices of abundance^ 

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( ) research vessel surveys 

Z7ZZ1 for BUTTERFISH from Massachu- 



-H setts inshore waters. 




rvr* 



1000. o 



WEIGHT 



NUMBER 



.1 



Figure 30. Indices of abundance; 

from spring C ) and autumn 

( ) research vessel surveys 

for SAND LANCE from Massachu- 
setts inshore waters. 





WEIGHT 



NUMBER 



1000 

































•=-vi-ij =i4= j ~ t 4 - 


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igure 31. Indices of abundai 

rom spring ( ) and autumn 

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Dr SPINY DOGFISH from Massa- 
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1978 79 



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100.0 



WEIGHT 



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" ■ : j -. : : Jr 


5 '- F: 


Lgure 32. inr.ices or aDunaanc 
?om spring ( ) and autumn 


:e 




. .._. 








'• • | j 


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a_ 




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vr> T TTTT T QWATT -Frx-mi M^«!«!a — 








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80 



81 



82 



1978 79 



80 



81 



82 



ioj.000- 

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o 

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6. 



Figure 36. Indices of abund- 
ance from spring ( ) and 

autumn C ) research vessel 

surveys for ALL SPECIES from 
Massachusetts inshore waters. 



4 



— j 




1978 79 



80 



81 



82 



1978 79 



80 



81 



82 



Table 1. Allotment of sampling effort 
to Massachusetts inshore 
strata, 1982 survey cruises. 







Stratum 


Depth Range 


Area 


Number 


Stations 


Reg 


ion 


No.* 


Meters 


Feet 


(sq n mi) 


Spring 


Autumn 


1. 


Buzzards Bay- 


11 


< 9.3 


< 30 


102 


5 


4 




Vineyard Sound 


12 


9.4-18.3 


31- 60 


160 


8 


8 




and coastal 


13 


18.4-27.4 


61- 90 


88 


3 


4 




water south of 


14 


27.5-36.6 


91-120 


16 


2 


2 




Martha's Vineyard 














2. 


Nantucket Sound 


15 


< 9.3 


< 30 


190 


10 


9 






16 


9.4-18.3 


31- 60 


212 


11 


11 


3. 


East of Cape Cod, 


17 


< 9.3 


< 30 


85 


2 


4 




Race Point to 


18 


9.4-18.3 


31- 60 


88 


4 


3 




Muskeget Island 


19 


18.4-27.4 


61- 90 


39 


2 


2 






20 


27.5-36.6 


91-120 


24 


2 


2 






21 


36.7-54.9 


121-180 


40 


2 


2 


4. 


Cape Cod Bay 


25 


< 9.3 


< 30 


47 


2 


3 






26 


9.4-18.3 


31- 60 


87 


5 


5 






27 


18.4-27.4 


61- 90 


94 


5 


5 






28 


27.5-36.6 


91-120 


93 


5 


5 






29 


36.7-54.9 


121-180 


103 


5 


5 






30 


>55.0 


>181 


32 


2 


2 


5. 


Massachusetts Bay 


31 


< 9.3 


< 30 


41 


3 


2 




north to New 


32 


9.4-18.3 


31- 60 


49 


2 


2 




Hamp shore border 


33 


18.4-27.4 


61- 90 


78 


3 


3 






34 


27.5-36.6 


91-120 


38 


3 


3 






35 


36.7-54.9 


121-180 


174 


5 


4 






36 


>55.0 


>181 


33 


4 


4 



Sampling strata begin with #11 to coordinate with Rhode Island survey design, 
Strata #22-24 have been allotted to Nantucket Shoals should survey coverage 
be eventually extended seaward. 



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Table 3. Weight (kilograms) and number for species col- 
lected during the 1982 spring and autumn bottom 
trawl surveys, Massachusetts territorial waters. 

Spring Autumn 



Species 


Wt. 


] 


to. 


Wt. 


No. 


Northern searobin 


5,917.7 


32 


,663 


116.9 


3,149 


Ocean pout 


3,040.2 


4 


,463 


327.7 


1,859 


Winter skate 


2,790.1 


1 


,723 


2,763.3 


1,673 


Little skate 


1,404.8 


3 


,431 


1,639.6 


3,053 


Winter flounder 


1,395.6 


4 


,695 


1,184.6 


5,035 


Mussels unclass. 


1,254.8 


89 


,366 


111.3 


4,562 


Windowpane 


1,054.6 


4 


,079 


164.3 


736 


Spiny dogfish 


927.9 




196 


13,496.8 


4,222 


American plaice 


659.2 


6 


,681 


350.7 


2,892 


Yellowtail flounder 


657.6 


2 


,153 


227.8 


1,167 


Cod 


647.0 


1 


,875 


33.9 


253 


Tautog 


572.4 




358 


60.8 


60 


Longhorn sculpin 


566.7 


3 


,418 


105.0 


1,072 


Moonsnail unclass. 


295.4 


1 


,958 


16.3 


167 


Red hake 


244.8 




670 


366.0 


1,735 


Sand lance 


197.2 


26 


,636 


140.2 


32,003 


Rock crab 


138.9 


1 


,372 


434.1 


4,998 


Summer flounder 


105.6 




153 


138.7 


174 


Smooth dogfish 


95.2 




21 


131.4 


275 


American lobster 


91.7 




320 


190.0 


618 


Spider crab 


70.4 




558 


50.7 


663 


Sea raven 


61.5 




67 


36.6 


92 


Lady crab 


55.3 


1 


,102 


72.2 


1,431 


Longfin squid 


52.7 




744 


379.7 


69,915 


Scup 


51.2 




543 


824.8 


190,807 


Thorny skate 


47.4 




16 


10.4 


9 


Black sea bass 


46.6 




112 


74.8 


20,134 


Goosefish 


42.1 




7 


110.5 


18 


Fourspot flounder 


41.3 




155 


48.5 


271 


Silver hake 


41.2 




413 


207.0 


4,154 


Wolffish 


30.6 




7 


8.8 


2 


Witch flounder 


26.4 




38 


37.6 


89 


Sea scallop 


21.3 




65 


18.8 


165 


Horseshoe crab 


19.0 




17 


47.9 


39 


Alewife 


15.5 




360 


0.3 


4 


Channeled whelk 


14.6 




42 


22.0 


47 


Atlantic herring 


12.5 




281 


22.3 


460 


Jonah crab 


12.5 




84 


11.7 


56 


Surf clam 


10.6 




30 


2.3 


7 


Cunner 


8.4 




116 


5.0 


173 


Mackerel 


7.4 




104 


0.1 


1 






Table 3. (Continued) 



Spring 



Species 

Snake blenny 

Lump fish 

Conger eel 

Bluefack herring 

White hake 

Pollock 

Haddock 

Wrymouth 

Knobbed whelk 

American shad 

Ocean quahog 

Butterfish 

Daubed shanny 

Bay scallop 

Alligatorfish 

Octopus 

Smelt 

Fourbeard rockling 

Rock gunnel 

Quahog 

Atlantic silverside 

Pipefish 

Grubby 

Radiated shanny 

Shortfin squid 

Striped anchovy 

Torpedo ray 

Redfish 

Shrimp unclass. 

Bluefish 

Northern puffer 

Striped searobin 

Planehead filefish 

Weakfish 

Northern kingfish 

Mackerel scad 

Spotted hake 

Hickory shad 

Offshore hake 

Hogchoker 

Lookdown 

Mantis shrimp 

Gulf stream flounder 

Moustache sculpin 

Flying gurnard 

Snowy grouper 

TOTAL 



> • 


No. 


7.0 


122 


6.1 


2 


4.8 


2 


4.2 


211 


3.9 


43 


3.4 


185 


1.9 


3 


1.4 


1 


1.4 


5 


1.2 


6 


1.1 


4 


1.0 


10 


0.7 


59 


0.6 


6 


0.4 


125 


0.4 


7 


0.2 


17 


0.2 


5 


0.1 


11 


0.1 


2 


0.0 


3 


0.0 


4 


0.0 


6 


0.0 


1 


0.0 


1 



22,786.4 191,933 



Autumn 


Wt. 


No. 


0.6 


25 


0.2 


15 


0.1 


2 


55.4 


497 


0.4 


6 


10.3 


1,190 


4.2 


5 


66.7 


115 


0.4 


2 


2.6 


9 


166.6 


17,284 


0.0 


1 


6.3 


137 


, 0.1 


34 


0.1 


8 


0.2 


8 


4.5 


66 


0.0 


4 


0.4 


1 


8.8 


426 


0.0 


1 


14.5 


75 


23.9 


24,081 


15.5 


1 


10.1 


41 


7.2 


- 


3.7 


2 


1.8 


89 


1.8 


17 


1.3 


107 


1.2 


35 


0.9 


9 


0.6 


123 


0.5 


9 


0.2 


1 


0.1 


1 


0.1 


1 


0.1 


41 


0.1 


1 


0.0 


1 


0.0 


1 


0.0 


1 


0.0 


1 


24,403.0 


402,715 



Table 4. Stratified mean number per tow of age 1 (5-22 cm) yellow- 
tail flounder from DMF spring and autumn research vessel 
surveys in Massachusetts inshore waters, 1978-1982. 



Stratified Mean Number Per Tow 



Age 1 (5-22 cm) 



1978 
79 
80 
81 
82 



Spring 


7.6 


8.4 


3.8 


13.6 


1.8 



Autumn 


4, 


,5 


15, 


,6 


14, 


,9 


1. 


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4. 


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Table 6 . 



Stratified mean number per tow of age 0, age 1, 
and adult scup taken in Massachusetts inshore 
bottom trawl surveys, spring and autumn, 1978- 
1982. 



Age 
Spring Autumn 

(_< 12 cm) 
1978 1,748.9 

79 1,071.8 

80 1,090.3 

81 871.4 

82 1,997.8 



Stratified Mean Number Per Tow 
Age 1 
Spring Autumn 
(< 14 cm) (13-18 cm) 



1.1 



1.7 



7.9 



122.8 



2.7 



13.2 



10.5 



19.0 



29.4 



13.5 



Adult 
Spring Autumn 
(> 15 cm) (> 19 cm) 



47.9 



39.0 



96.8 



36.6 



3.0 



3.7 



6.3 



2.9 



10.4 



1.8 



Table 7 . Total and prerecruit (<_ 8 cm) stratified mean 

numbers per tow of longfin squid from DMF autumn 
research vessel surveys in Massachusetts inshore 
waters, 1978-1982. 



1978 
1979 
1980 
1981 
1982 



All Sizes 
550.0 
362.3 
258.7 
284.8 
650.9 



< 8 cm 

519.5 

353.4 

240.1 

248.1 

640.0 






rr 



Table 8 . Percentage of prerecruit fish of 23 commercially valuable species 
taken by region (principal abundance) and coastwide on combined 
1978-82 Massachusetts spring inshore surveys. 



Maximum 
length of 
prerecruit s * 





(cm) 


1 


2 


Region 
3 


4 


5 


Coast 
wide 


American lobster 


80 mm 


96.6 




42.0 


86.6 


86.5 


86.0 


American plaice 


31 








97.3 


95.2 


96.0 


Atlantic cod 


49 


100.0 


100.0 


99.3 


93.0 


95.3 


96.2 


Atlantic herring 


10 


94.4 






0.3 


34.3 


53.0 


Black sea bass 


17 


0.0 


0.0 








0.0 


Butterfish 


15 


60.0 


23.1 


44.3 






55.3 


Goosefish 


29 








5.4 


0.0 


ft ft 


Haddock 


43 






98.5 


100.0 


97.3 


97.9 


Longfin squid 


9 


30.2 


11.9 


36.9 






19.7 


Oceanpout 


37 






11.9 


44.1 


24.5 


36.3 


Pollock 


42 






100.0 


100.0 


99.7 


99.8 


Red hake 


34 


58.9 




17.1 


66.6 


82.8 


44.8 


Rock crab 


8 


87.6 


74.3 


69.5 


44.0 


28.5 


64.3 


Sea scallop 


6 








9.2 




ft* 


Scup 


17 


46.3 


29.0 








46.4 


Silver hake 


23 


44.6 




18.7 


59.3 


69.9 


55.7 


Spiny dogfish 


84 


7.9 


6.6 


59.2 






43.2 


Summer flounder 


29 


5.2 


0.8 


0.0 






2.7 


White hake 


40 








89.6 


96.6 


93.7 


Windowpane 


29 


80.5 


51.0 


70.8 






62.8 


Winter flounder 


31 


76.9 


60.8 


57.6 


81.2 


80.1 


75.5 


Witch flounder 


31 








0.7 


10.1 


7.9 


Yellowtail flounder 


31 

inoi 






69.4 


80.6 


56.2 


67.0 



** Not calculated. 



Job 2 : Evaluation of winter flounder year-class strength 

INTRODUCTION 

Assessment of spawning success can be crucial to effective fishery resource 
management. A timeseries of winter flounder (blackback) young-of-the-year (YOY) 
indices may predict annual changes in stock size or composition. Recruitment 
from the southern Cape Cod estuaries is to territorial and offshore fisheries 
south and east of Cape Cod (Howe and Coates 1975). This population group has 
been identified as a major Massachusetts stock unit area (Pierce and Howe 1977). 
Methodology for estimating YOY abundance was based on knowledge of habitat, age 
group behavior, and highly localized movement patterns. YOY blackback are most 
abundant on fine-grained sediments in estuarine areas, moving into the inter- 
tidal zone with a rising tide to feed (Tyler 1971). 

Efforts to develop beach seining methodology began in 1972. Baseline 
data was collected in 1975 and annual sampling has continued since then. In 
this report, we present 1975-1982 seine indices of abundance (IOA) and evidence 
supporting the validity of the seine index for predicting annual changes in 
winter flounder stock size. 



METHODS 

Assessment of winter flounder year-class strength was initially undertaken 
in six estuaries on the southern shore of Cape Cod and in six estuaries in upper 
Buzzards Bay. By 1979 it was apparent that seine data, as then analyzed, did 
not reveal annual changes in year-class production because of broad confidence 
limits projected from standard deviations of seine indices. Alternative analysis 
techniques were investigated during 1980. Stratification, based on each estuary's 
littoral perimeter, was ultimately utilized to improve precision of the IOA. 
An additional statistical term to post-stratify previous surveys was incorporated 
into the re-analysis of the 1975-1981 variances. In 1982 samples were allocated 
in proportion to the relative weight for each stratum (estuary). Sampling of 
Buzzards Bay estuaries, where catches had always been low, was eliminated and 
the number of stations in the southern Cape Cod estuaries was increased. 

The seine survey was conducted yearly from mid- June to mid- July, and was 
restricted to the top half of the diurnal tidal cycle. In most years, at least 
99 seine hauls were made in southern Cape Cod estuaries. Sampling site selection 
was subjective, with consideration given to substratum suitability for efficient 
seining (i.e., beaches of less than 0.5 m tidal amplitude and smooth intertidal 
bottom). At each station three tows, from a depth of 1.0-1.3 m and perpendicular 
to shore, were made with a 6.5 mm nylon mesh, 6 m straight seine equipped with a 
weighted lead line to minimize escapement. Area swept was estimated by multiply- 
ing seine spread (maintained at 5.5 m with a taut spreader rope) by seining 
distance (measured by pace). 



21 



A FORTRAN program (YOYSTAT), written by DMF personnel, was used to calcul- 
ate a mean number of YOY/m 2 for each tow. From this an average number of YOY/m 2 
and a standard deviation for each stratum were calculated, and for all estuaries 
combined, a stratified mean, y , and variance, V,- v were computed for each 
year. st 

Area swept was calculated as follows: 

A. = (G. x P) L 

1 3 

where: P = length of pace of individual (meters) 

L = length of net (meters) 

G. = number of paces taken at tow j 

Catch per tow was calculated as follows : 

y. = F./A. 

where: F. = number of fish at tow i 
1 

A. = area of tow j (meters squared) 



Stratum means were calculated as follows: 

n i 

y. = ( Z Y^)/ n i 
1 i=l D i 



where: n. = number of tows in stratum i 

l 

Stratum variances were calculated as follows: 



2 9 9 

S. = [Zy/ - (Ey/)] 

n.- 1 3 2 — 

l n. 

i 

Survey stratified means (1975-1982) and variances (1975-1981) were calculated 
as follows: 

i K 

N i=l 



V- 1 9 1 1-N. ~ 

Vt> =i 2 /a + ( i 2 s( L> s i > 

N l ~T7- n i n 



22 



Where: K = total number of strata 

N = total weighting coefficient of all K strata 

N.= weighting coefficient of stratum i 

The formula for variance applied to 1982 data, i.e., without the additional 
post-stratification term was: 

V,t v 1 N.S. 2 

<y st ) = 2 £-±-i- 

N n. 

l 

To compare and analyze differences in stratified mean density indices 
between years, the Wilcoxon two-way nonparametric test was applied to each 
pair of years. To validate the predictive value of our seining methodology, 
we compared trends in the stratified mean density index to length-frequency 
modes from our semiannual bottom trawl survey. Prior tagging and meristic 
studies (Howe and Coates 1975; Howe et al. 1976; Pierce and Howe 1977) indicated 
that winter flounder may recruit to the fishery by moving from estuaries onto 
the inshore grounds south and east of Cape Cod defined in the bottom trawl 
survey as regions 1, 2, and 3. Winter flounder length-frequency data for 
stations in these regions were weighted and pooled for each cruise of the survey. 



RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 

Stratified YOY means (y.) for each estuary are presented in Table 1. The 
stratified mean density indices (y ) for the seine surveys are shown in Table 2 
and Figure 1. The stratified mean density index for 1977 (0.62) was the highest 
in the timeseries. Nonparametric testing revealed that the density index for 
1977 was significantly different from all other years except 1979 (Table 3). 

The stratified pooled length- frequency information from the spring and 
autumn trawl surveys show seasonal and yearly changes in size (age) structure 
of winter flounder occurring in regions 1-3 (Figure 2). In spring, post-spawning 
adult winter flounder disperse from estuarine areas and recruit to the coastal 
fishery. Any juveniles about 10 cm or larger that had moved to coastal grounds 
over winter were catchable by our research trawl. Until blackbacks are about 
20 cm in length, however, they are not vulnerable to larger mesh commercial 
codends . 

In spring, 1978, the length-frequency mode at 12 cm mainly represented the 
fast-growing one-year-olds, or fish of the 1977 year-class. Slower- growing fish 
of the previous cohort probably comprised a smaller portion of this modal range 
as well. No other initial mode in the spring timeseries was of similar magnitude, 
implying that the 1977 year-class was the strongest observed at age 1. 



23 



The initial autumn modal peak at a smaller size is probably indicative of 
slower- growing individuals. Again, the 1977 year-class was clearly the dominant 
one at age 1 in the autumn timeseries. It should be noted that the autumn and 
spring length-frequencies are plotted on different scales because of much lower 
catches occuring in September. Adult winter flounder usually do not return 
inshore until after our fall cruise. The bulk of the juvenile population 
resides in the estuaries during the warm-water months though it is not unreason- 
able to suspect some emigration from a strong year- class as a result of density- 
dependent competition. 

The 1977 year-class appeared to comprise a major element of both spring 
and autumn research catches in 1979 and 1980. This is shown in Figure 2 by 
the magnitude and robustness of modes representing two-and three-year-olds. 
While winter flounder abundance generally declined in regions 1-3 during this 
period (refer to Figure 6 of the previous report), the stratified mean length 
increased from 1978 through 1980, illustrating the passage of this cohort to 
the mean age of recruitment. 

Enhanced recruitment beginning in 1980 is indicated by commercial fisheries 
statistics. In 1980, reported landings from all fishing grounds encompassing 
the range of movement for this population group, i.e., Vineyard and Nantucket 
Sounds (NMFS statistical area 538), West Side South Channel (521), Nantucket 
Shoals (526), and southern New England (537), showed an unprecedented annual 
increase (77%) to 8,197 MT. While some of this gain was due to an increase in 
effort (14%), it is probable that a real increase in population biomass occurred 
(S.H. Clark, personal communication, 1983). Landings increased again in 1981 
to 8,561 MT, undoubtedly reflecting the continuing strength and recruitment of 
the 1977 year-class. 

Although not statistically different from other years, the 1979 YOY mean 
density index was the second highest in the timeseries. Unlike the 1977 year- 
class, this was not initially apparent from survey length- frequencies until 
autumn, 1980 (Figure 2). In spring, 1981, its relative strength appeared to 
have been partially masked by fast-growing one-year-olds (1980 year-class). 

In summary, changes in the seine survey sampling design and refinements in 
analysis have resulted in more precise indices of winter flounder year-class 
abundance. The significantly strongest year-class in the seine survey timeseries 
compares favorably with subsequent percent length- frequency composition modes in 
the inshore bottom trawl survey timeseries. This 1977 cohort appears to have 
contributed substantially to winter flounder biomass on territorial and offshore 
grounds as substantiated by nominal commercial landings of winter flounder. 



REFERENCES 

Howe, A.B. and P.G. Coates. 1975. Winter flounder movements, growth, and 
mortality off Massachusetts. Transactions of the American Fisheries 
Society 104:13-29. 



24 



Howe, A.B. and P.G. Coates. 1976. Winter flounder estuarine year-class 

abundance, mortality, and recruitment. Transactions of the American 
Fisheries Society 105:647-657. 

Pierce, D.E. and A.B. Howe. 1977. A further study on winter flounder group 
identification off Massachusetts. Transactions of the American Fish- 
eries Society 106:131-139. 

Tyler, A.V. 1971. Surges of winter flounder, Pseudopleuronectes americanus , 
into the intertidal zone. Journal Fisheries Research Board Canada 
28:1727-1732. 



25 



Figure 1. 



Stratified mean density (y t ) for 
young-of-the-year winter flounder 
from southern Cape Cod estuaries, 
1975-1982. 



to 

Z 

LU 

Q 



Z 
< 



.6-- 



.5-- 



< 

tO 



.4-- 



3- lmmiii iil lll ll l J : 



75 



76 



77 



78 

YEAR 



79 



80 



81 



82 



Figure 2. Stratified mean number per tow for regions 1 - 3 by 



3-r 



2-- 






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W 

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length frequency intervals for winter flounder 
j < 77 inshore bottom trawl survey .1978 - 1982. 



197 



SPRING 
AUTUMN 




1979 




1980 




1981 




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Length in centimeters 



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cr 


4-> 


2 


(0 


-0 


U 


03 


o 


0) 


03 


4J 


O 


^2 


CJ 


J 


CQ 


C/5 



Table 2. Stratified mean density indices (y ) for 

young-of-the-year winter flounder, 1975-1982. 



Stock Unit Year 



No. of 
Stations 



Stratified mean 
density index 

<y s t> 



95% 
Confidence Limits 



South coast 
of Cape Cod 



1975 



1976 



14 



37 



0.31 



0.33 



0.293-0.327 



0.318-0.342 






1977 



1978 



37 



35 



0.62 



0.34 



0.602-0.638 
0.322-0.358 



1979 



37 



0.49 



0.473-0.507 



1980 



36 



0.40 



0.386-0.414 



1981 



33 



0.33 



0.315-0.345 



1982 



48 



0.38 



0.359-0.401 



'"able 3. Summary of z statistics (corrected for ties) 
from V/ilcoxon nonparametric 

tests for two-way comparisons of YOY winter flounder 
densities (y _,_) between years. 



?6 



7? 



73 



79 



30 



81 



3? 



7^ -1.0130" -2.17^0 -0.0221 -1.^936 -0.9075 -0.1671 -0.1515 

7* -2.1519* -1.2627 -1.1093 -0.2300 -0.9226 -1.0323 

77 ^2.6984* -1.19^6 -1.9971* -2.5870* -2.7212 

78 -1.9322 -1.1156 -0.0377 -0.0922 

79 -0.9268 -1.3^10 -1.7316 



80 
31 



-1.0075 -0.8225 



-0.1915 



Significant at P= 0.05 



Appendix Table 1 



Average bottom temperature by depth interval and region, Massachusetts 
inshore bottom trawl surveys, spring and autumn, 1982. 






Region 

1 






SPRING 
Depth (m) 
< 9.3 9.4-18.3 18.4-27.4 27.5-36.6 36.7-54.9 > 55.0 Mean Range 



11.7 



11.2 



10.9 



7.0 



10.5 



11.0 



8.8 



5.8 



9.8 



8.0 



5.6 



5.8 



6.6 



4.9 



4.6 



4.4 



4.4 



10.2 5.3-14.0 



11.1 8.8-12.0 



8.0 4.2-11.0 



5.3 3.3- 7.0 






7.1 



6.3 



5.1 



4.7 



4.7 



4.3 



5.2 3.2- 7.9 









Region 
1 
2 
3 
4 
5 



AUTUMN 
Depth (m) 

<9.3 9.4-18.3 18.4-27.4 27.5-36.6 36.7-54.9 > 55.0 Mean Range 
17.3 17.4 16.9 15.4 17.0 13.5-18.2 



18.3 
15.9 
16.1 
13.0 



18.3 

14.7 
12.3 
12.4 



12.6 
9.2 
9.4 



9.5 
7.8 
7.5 



7.2 
7.5 
7.7 



7.8 



7.1 



18.3 14.7-20.4 



12.8 



9.9 



8.9 



7.2-16.8 



6.9-17.3 



6.9-14.1 



Table 2. Stratified mean number per tow (untransformed) for Atlantic cod 

length frequency intervals for regions 1-5, Massachusetts inshore 
bottom trawl survey, spring and autumn, 1982. 



SPRING 



AUTUMN 



Regions 



th 



2 
3 

4 
5 
6 

7 

e 

9 

10 

II 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

-22 

23 

_24 

25 
26 

27 

28 

29 

30 

31 

32 

33 

34 

35 

36 

37 

38 

39 

40 

41 

42 

43 

44 

45 

47 



.055 

. .811 

5.583 

15.246 

..4.678 

.696 



.095 
1.048 
3.388 
1.955 

_ .521 
.142 



.130 

.681 

4.904 

2.067 

,.476 



.083 
.276 
.041 



.041 



.072 
.072 



.022 



.145 
.072 
.217 

.087 
. 406 
.319 
.435 
.217 
. 145 
.116 

.043 
.072 

.072 
.043 
.072 



.245 

.043 
.043 

. 087 
.043 
.072 



.045 
.213 

.331 

.414 
.172 
.776 

.820 
.376 
.604 

.300 

.501 

.255 

.177. 

.466 

.263 

.373 

.170 
.090 
.208 
.286 
.132 

.209 
.583 
.768 
.082 
.292 
.038 

.207 
.082 
.079 
.082 

.125 
.082 



.119. 
..895 
.990 
.611 



.031 

.083 
.421 
.337 
.616 

1.038 
.981 

2.793 

3.233 
2.563 
2.768 
2.945 
3.237 
2.610 
2.589 
1.397 
1.006 
1.271 

.749 
.934 
.965 
.943 
.890 

.814 

.813 
1.640 

.839 
1.214 

.119 

.479 
.388 

.573 
.871 
.451 
.380 
.602 



.043 



.071 



.041 


.262 


.086 


1.475 


.086 


2.511 


.038 


.199 


.038 


.063 


.038 


.119 


.038 


1.385 




1.007 


.041 


1.278 




.559 




.327 




.094 




.063 




.031 



.072 



.105 

i 

.421 

.421 

.105 

.421 

.948 

.316 j 

.843 

.527 

.316 
.421 
.421 

.316 

.105 
.105 
.211 
.211 
.336 
.105 

.105 

.020 
.125 
.020 
.020 
.105 



Appendix Table 2. (Cont.) 



SPRING 



AUTUMN 



Regions 



engtF 



5o 



60 



U 



055 



055 



.055 
.055 

.055 
.109 

.055 
.055 



.055 
.055 



.055 
.055 

.055 



.055 



.072 
.072 



.072 

.116 

.072 



. 043 
.072 



.043 
.072 

.072 
.043 



.041 
• 041 
.079 
.045 

.125 
.082 
.247 
.123 
.041 

.041 

.045 
.082 

.041 
.041 
.045 
.127 

.041 

.079 
.041 



.041 



.041 



.041 
.041 
.041 
.041 



.122 
.517 
.237 
.167 

.486 
.104 
.232 
.370 
.169 
.169 
.020 

.199 
.020 



.117 
.063 

.020 



105 



020 



105 



.063 



.072 



.041 



.041 



Appendix Table 2. (Cont. ) 



SPRING 



AUTUMN 













Regions 












1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 

















-- -•-- — 


. 






" 


- - ■ 















.... . 







— 












• 
















- — 


- 


- 


: 





- 









_ - .. 


. _ — — 


_ — 


— 


— — 


- 


. - — 















. _ 


— — .. 





* 





- . . 


- 






9 

9o 


-- 





— — 


.090 












- ■ 


1 

2 






— 


. ... . 






.-:: 








3 

4 








.045 














5 

A 






■ — 


.... . . . - . .. 


— "- - - 


. — — ■-- _ . 


■- 








* w 

7 






















.8 








.041 














.9 

. lQo 
















_ 






. 1 










. . . 












.2 










- 












3 
























- 4 
























5 
























6 
























7 
























8 
























9 
























110 

1 
























1 

2 
























3 
























4 






















5 










, 


_. 




. 






6 






















7 






















8 
























9 

U. 






.072 


















1 
























2 
























3 
























4 










- 














5 
























6 
























.7 

| 51 














- 










27.911 


7.148 


12.301 


11.956 


49.274 






0.187 


0.407 


16.654 




^gth 


6.84 


5.31 


15.38 


33.30 


28.55 






20.07 


6.13 


18.25 



nppenuix 

Table 3, 



Stratified mean number per tow (untransformed) for haddock 
length frequency intervals for regions 1-5, Massachusetts inshore 
bottom trawl survey, spring and autumn, 1982. 



SPRING 



AUTUMN 



Regions 



mgth 
cm) 





1 


2 


3 


H 


5 


1 ■ 


2 


3 


4 


5 


1 




._ 






— 





— 


--"--•-■ 






2 


- 







3 

4 


._ _ 


— 


— - - - 


— 


S- 


— - ■ 


• 







- 


5 

6 


— . — — 


— • 


■ 





- — 


— 


• - • 


_...._ 


.127 
.161 


.408 


7 




1.338 


e 
















.418 


.368 


6.635 


9 
















1.159 


.041 


13,713 


10 
















1.000 


.254 


23.108 


1 1 
















.290 


.041 


10.746 


12 
















.145 




2.479 


13 






— 














.402 


U 






_ 
















15 


m 


r 




- •• ■ - 












.031 


16 












- • - - 










17 




... ._ 








.... _. 


- 








IB 




_ _ 


















19 




- ■— 












- 






20 




. _ 


















2\ 


_ .. 


. .. 


















21 








.035 














23 




— 



















.24 






„ . . ._ 
















25 






_ _ - .. 


.035 














26 






_. . . 


_ . . 














27 






._. 
















28 








. _. 














29 






















30 






















31 






















32 






















.33 






















34 














► 








35 






.. 










. 






36 






















37 






















38 






















39 






















40 






















41 






















42 






















43 























44 






















45 








_ 














46 






. - 
















47 

-— 4J. 




- 


— ■ 


• 














1 






















*gth 























Appendix Table 3. (Cont.) 






SPRING 



AUTUMN 

















Regions 










, ngth 

! nm 1 


1 


2 


3 


* 


5 


• 

1 


2 


* 3 


4 


5 






„ _. 


, — ..-. 





« 


----- - 




- - • 




- 


9 

5o 

1 


_....... 





.012 


- 




- 




6 




- 


1 

2 






7_.. 




- . - 












3 






... 














i 


1 4 




. — - 






• 




— 








5 








- - 






- 


- --' " "* 


— ■ — 


- 


6 




. 










, 










7 
























* 
























9 






















6o 






















i 






















2 
3 

4 










































5 






















6 






















7 






















8 






















9 






















7o 

1 






















1 

1 2 






















| 3 






















! 4 


» 




















5 








_ 


m 












6 






















7 






• 
















8 






















1 * 






















8. 






















1 

2 






















3 






















1 4 






















5 






















6 























-J 






- 
























0.072 


0.070 








3.013 


0.993 


58.858 






" 






50.00 


23.50 








9.53 


8.26 


9.74 



Table 4, 



Stratified mean number per tow (untransformed) for silver hake 
length frequency intervals for regions 1-5, Massachusetts inshore 
bottom trawl survey, spring and autumn, 1982. 



SPRING 



AUTUMN 













Regions 










th 
) 


1 


. 2 


3 


4 


5 


1 * 


2 


3 


4 


5 


. 1 

2 
3 




- 


•- — — — ■ 


— . 


~~ ■ ■ ~ 









.041 




4 
5 


- 


• 




— 


♦ .... 


.219 


... — 


.688 




.105 


6 






.319 






3.322 
5.667 
8.014 


,105 


2.565 
3.592 
2.377 


.122 
.123 
.117 


.105 


7 


.080 







.156 


8 


.387 




.020 


9 


.959 




.221 


.041 


.080' 


8.191 


.468 


1.585 


.281 


.184 


10 


2.463 




.150 


.045 


.100 


7.936 


.527 


.443 


.045 


.127 


11 


.944 


• 0.48 


,.159 


.166. 


.328 . 


5.254 


.575 


.533 


.041 


.054 


12 


.863 




.114 


.121 


.288 


3.197 


.144 


.072 


.153 


1.970 


13 


.514 




• 07 1 


• 121 


.224 


3.721 




.071 


.443 


4.501 


14 


.590 






. 070 


.288 


1.268 




.043 


.524 


9.270 


15 


.313 








J.04 


.661 




.216 


1.750 


12.160 


16 


.211 


.048 






.020" 


I_~ .301 




.897 


2.951 


12.121 


17 


.077 








.020 






3.206 


4.518 


8.919 


IB 








.045 


.124 






3.420 


6.126 


6,924 


19 


.135 






. .045 


.040 






5.245 , 


6.900 


4.775 


20 








.045 


.144 






.6.315 


6.110 


3.097 


21 


.022 




.072 




.124 


.022 




4.174 


3.089 


2.094 


22 








.045 


.248 


.120 




3.377 


2.082 


.530 


23 








.125 


.103 


.044 




.812 


1.194 


.485 


. 24 








.166 


.083 


.066 




.145 


.780 


.594 


25 


.044 




.043 


•082 


.251 


.180 




.333 


.604 


.842 


26 


.153 






.290 


.228 






.478 


.618 


1.182 


27 


.197 






.041 


.084 


.022 




.362 


.994 


1.217 


28 


.415 




.072 




.084 


.022 




.072 


.950 


.696 


29 


.546 






.041 


.063 






.087 


.673 


.857 


30 


.361 






.076 




.044 




.130 


.614 


.741 


31 


.109 








.294 


.022 






.532 


.425 


32 


.175 








.059 


.022 






.241 


.305 


33 


.022 






.045 


.169 








.267 


.160 


34 


.066 








.169 








.221 


.311 


35 


.066 








.084 


.022 






.090 


.060 


36 


.022 






.045 










.041 


.185 


37 


.131 






.045 


.031 








.136 


.120 


38 








.045 


.059 








.041 


.040 


39 








.041 


.083 








.127 


.080 


40 


.022 






.082 










.090 


.291 


41 








.035 










.045 


.060 


42 








.041 


.084 










.020 


43 


.022 








.040 








.045 




44 










.020 










.125 


45 








.045 










.045 


.020 


46 

47 









.045 










.045 
.041 






9.908 


0.096 


1.223 


2.036 


4.123 


48.335 


1.820 


41.239 


43.849 


75.928 


8th 

• 


15.68 


_ 13.50 


12.04 


24.50 


22.55 


9.72 


10.04 


16,31 


20,17 


17.56 



fable 4. Stratified mean number per tow (untransformed) for silver hake 

length frequency intervals for regions 1-5, Massachusetts inshore 
bottom trawl survey, spring and autumn, 1982. 



SPRING 



AUTUMN 













Regions 










flgth 






















cm) 


l 


. 2 


3 


4 


5 


1 * 


2 


3 


4 


5 


.1 

2 
3 




— — — - — 


__.. ._ 


— : ._ ... 


— — 





-— — — — 


..... . 


.041 




A 










* .... 










.. 


5 












.219 




.688 




.105 


6 






— — 




• - 


3.322 
5.667 


,105 


2.565 
3.592 


.122 
.123 


.105 


7 


• 080_ 






.156 


8 


.387 




.319 






8.014 




2.377 


.117 


.020 


9 


.959 




.221 


.041 


.080' 


8.191 


.468 


1.585 


.281 


.184 


10 


2.463 




.150 


.045 


.100 


7.936 


.527 


.443 


.045 


.127 


11 


. 944 


• O.M-8 


,.1.59 


.166 


.328 . 


5.254 


. .575 


.533 


.041 


.054 


12 


.863 




.114 


.121 


.288 


3.197 


.144 


.072 


.153 


1.970 


13 


.514 




• 07 1 


._121 


.224 


3.721 




.071 


.443 


4.501 


14 


.590 






. 070 


.288 


1.268 




.043 


.524 


9.270 


15 


.313 








.104 


.661 




.216 


1.750 


12.160 


" 


.211 


.048 






.020" 


".301 




.897 


2.951 


12.121 


17 

1 


.077 








.020 






3.206 


4.518 


8.919 


18 








.045 


.124 






3.420 


6.126 


6,924 


19 


.135 






_ .045 


.040 






5.245 , 


6.900 


4.775 


20 








.045 


.144 






6.315 


6.110 


3.097 


2\ 


.022 




.072 




.124 


.022 




4.174 


3.089 


2.094 


22 








.045 


.248 


.120 




3.377 


2.082 


.530 


23 








.125 


.103 


.044 




.812 


1.194 


.485 


.24 








.166 


.083 


.066 




.145 


.780 


.594 


25 


.044 




.043 


•082 


.251 


.180 




.333 


.604 


.842 


26 


.153 






.290 


.228 






.478 


.618 


1.182 


27 


.197 






.041 


.084 


.022 




.362 


.994 


1.217 


26 


.415 




.072 




.084 


.022 




.072 


.950 


.696 


29 


.546 






.041 


.063 






.087 


.673 


.857 


i 

30 


.361 






.076 




.044 




.130 


.614 


.741 


31 


.109 








.294 


.022 






.532 


.425 


32 


.175 








.059 


.022 






.241 


.305 


.33 


.022 






.045 


.169 








.267 


.160 


34 


.066 








.169 








.221 


.311 


35 


.066 








.084 


.022 






.090 


.060 


36 


.022 






.045 










.041 


.185 


37 


.131 






.045 


.031 








.136 


.120 


38 








.045 


.059 








.041 


.040 


39 








.041 


.083 








.127 


.080 


i <0 


.022 






.082 










.090 


.291 


! 4 ' 








.035 










.045 


.060 


42 








.041 


.084 










.020 


43 


.022 








.040 








.045 




44 










.020 










.125 


45 








.045 










.045 


.020 


46 








.045 










.045 




47 




. 


















-— M 


















.041 






9.908 


0.096 


1.223 


2.036 


4.123 


48.335 


1.820 


41.239 


43.849 


75.928 


eth 


15.68 


. 13.50 


12.04 


24.50 


22.55 


9.72 


10.04 


16.31 


20,17 


17.56 



Table 5. Stratified mean number per tow ( unt ran s formed) for red hake 

length frequency intervals for regions 1-5, Massachusetts inshore 
bottom trawl survey, spring and autumn, 1982. 



SPRING 



AUTUMN 



Regions 



' 


jngth 
(cm) 

_1. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


• 

1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


.3 

A 


.,0_56 

.167 
.....056 


- 


. ._ 













— — 




~~ ■■■ 




5 
6 
7 






— — . . 


.12_0. 












— 
















8 




.048 




















9 


; .136 










.361 











10 


.055 






.076 


.020 . 


*_022 




. 


.045 


.113 


1) 


.153 
.142 


- ■ 


- ■ 


.079 




-..139 - 










.063 


12 


. ^ .534 


_._..,..104._ 


. .579 


13 


.328 


• 048 




,iao 


.208 










1.512 




14 


.066 


.048 




.480 


..323. . 


.180. . 




...072 




1.564 


..15 


.308 






.362. 


.303 






.217 


.041 


1.831 


16 


" .165 






.423. 


.040 


.._. 


. __ 


.435 


.041 


1.757 


17 






.141.. 


.115 


.040 




. . 


1.638 


.123 


2.494 


IB 


.022 


! 




.171 








1.710 


.082 


2.100 


19 


.087 








.033 


.139 




2.594 . 


.621 


1.610 


20 


.121 






.045 








1.638 


.950 


2.098 


21 


.022 






.070 


.144 


.161 




.957 


1.655 


1.262 


12 


.022 


i 




.090 


____.084_ 






.580 


2.461 


.865 


... -23 


•056 


i 




,070. ... 


... _..Q.84_. 


.022 




.072 


3.686 


1.308 


21 


.022 




.043 


.131 

.041 
_ .045 


..... ,02.0 
.104 
. 020 


.161 
• 066 
.153 


- 


.072 
.072 


1.918 
1.455 
1.074 


.367 


25 

1 26 


- - !- 


.535 
.857 


27 


.0t+i+ 


: 




_ ...070 _ 




.022 


-i .- 




.650 


.738 


28 


.022 






_. ...125 




.227 


i 

i 
•1 




.811 


1.107 


29 


.022 






__. .252 


.104 


.153 


i 




1.173 


1.049 


30 








.131 




.109 






2.014 


1.140 




31 








... .090 


.020 








2.026 


1.038 


32 




' 




.136 










2.839 


.888 


33 


.240 




.495 


• 226 










1.992 


.811 




34 


.71+3 




. ..141 . 


_ .136 




.066 


w 




—1.170 


_ .592 




35 


.590 




1-201 


•121 


.084 








1.584 


.345 




36 






1.060 


•296 


.l**7_ 








1.475 


.341 




37 


.721 




.928 


.221 


.253 








1.382 


.305 


38 


.71+3 




1.473 


.127 


.135 








1.290 


.245 


39 


.787 


' 


.779 


.090 


.147 


.022 






.612 


.470 


40 


.962 




2.781 


.240 


.188 


.022 






.767 


.361 


4, 


.71+3 


.048 


.891 


.082 


.031 








.533 


.265 


42 


2.1+04 


.048 


1.183 . 


.127 


.169 








.331 


.325 


43 


1.603 




1.306 


.090 


.063 








.462 


.040 


1 U 


1.224 




.750 


.082 










.197 


.356 


45 


.481 




.476 


.238 










.730 


.105 


46 


.240 




.873 


.... .J082 


..•210 








.266 


.080 


1 * 7 


.743 




.159 


.041 


„._iP.?0 


- 






.244 
.511 


.145 
.040 


8th 


' 


p 




- - - 















Appendix Table 5 . ( Cont . ) 



SPRING 



AUTUMN 



Regions 



ength 



__3_ 



9 

5o 



6o 



— 





_a2!£0 


— _ 


.022 




.481 









_. . 


— , — . 



080 



. 022 

.262 
.022 



080 



.082 

.,035. 
,041 

.._0H-1_ 

.041 



.063 



.150 


.060 


.125 


.100 


.203 


.040 


.243 


,020 


.172 


.020 


.035 




.070 


.060 


.082 




.080 




.045 


.060 



7o 



.041 



.045 




15.345 
38.03 



.240 
23.60 



14.982 
39.85 



6.176 
27.51 



3.164 
28.47 



2.145 
19.99 



10.058 
18.89 



38.462 
30.91 



32.060 
23.63 



. .- (-"- 4 4 ^ — <*V 

Table 6. 



Stratified mean number per tow (untransformed) for white hake 
length frequency intervals for regions 1-5, Massachusetts inshore 
bottom trawl survey, spring and autumn, 1982. 



SPRING 



AUTUMN 



Regions 



ngth 



U 





1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


1 * 


2 


3 


4 


5 








. . . - . 







- ■ 










_ 2 


-■■ - - --— 







- 3 


— - 


— ■ ~ 


— 




s 




• 


.638 











• 1H3 




- — -• - 




- 




- 








"".109 


.095 


- 






.055 


• - - - 


.460 


.079 




8 








9 












10 












.164 




.106 
.248 






11 










12 




.095 




.041 


.020 






.864 


.153 




U 




.047 




.041 


.084 






.565 


.318 




14 




.142 




.045 


.337 


.055 




1.038 


.630 




15 




.047 






.104 


.055 
.055 




1.380 
.429 


.514 
.308 


.031 


\6 












.383 




.145 


.235 


.061 


17 






















18 










.020 


.164 




.377 


.243 


.490 


19 




.048 






.104 


.055 






.254 


.670 


20 










.063 






.072 


.459 


1.645 


21 












.055 


. . . 


.816 


.539 


1.247 


22 










.020 


.055 




.145 


.510 


1.080 


23 








.045 




.055 






.509 


1.728 


-24 














-. 




.430 


1.473 


25 










.020 


.109 






.341 


.965 


26 








.090 


.040 








.090 


.496 


27 








.035 










.214 


.418 


28 










.020 








.045 


.167 


29 












.022 






.045 


.031 


30 










.084 








.045 




31 


















.168 




32 


















.262 




.33 


















.045 


.092 


34 






» 












.086 


.061 


35 










.020 








.176 


.031 


36 


















.168 


.031 


37 


















.041 


.105 


38 








.045 










.136 




39 


















.045 




40 






















41 


















.086 




42 






















43 


















.127 




44 


















.086 




45 






















46 










.020 








.041 




47 


















.045 
.041 




5th. 




















" 



Appendix Table 6. (Cont.) 



SPRING 



AUTUMN 



Regions 



mgtF 
ad— 



9 

5o 
i 
i 

3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
B 
9 

6o 
l 

2 

3 

. 4 

5 

6 

7 
8 
9 

7o 

1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 



0.109 
7.00 



0.616 
11.15 



0.343 
27.47 



0.957 
18.82 



1.279 
17.25 



.045 



.045 
.041 
.041 

.082 



7.284 
13.91 



7.769 
24.02 



4$: 



.822 
74 



*^^^r 



*mm 



Table 7 . 


Stratified mean number per 


tow (untransformed) for scup 










length frequency intervals for regions 1-5, Massachusetts inshore 








bottom trawl survey, spring and autumn, 1982. 








SPRING AUTUMN 




. 




Regions 




mgth 












• 










1 cm) 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


i 

2 
3 




■ 








.109 


.192 








4 










• 


177.510 


130.105 




.038 




5 












2005.549 


1058.346 


3.784 


1.099 




6 












2902.598 


1183.633 


15.014 


.240 




7 


.111 










1037.846 


598.191 


27.670 


.172 




1 8 


.111 




* 






463.234 


209.201 


5.697 






9 


1.221 


.096 








208.169 


7.881 


.799 






10 


3.632 


.719 








67.617 










11 


3.737 


1.581 








33.060 


.048 








12 


1.886 


.527 








1.872 


1.135 








13 


.056 










2.112 


8.285 


.616 






14 


.166 










6.448 


8.023 


1.309 






15 


.995 




-• 


— - -- 




7.350 


18.442 


1.540 






16 


2.317 


.190 








5.936 


1.726 


1.155 






17 


3.085 


.806 








1.893 


.258 


.154 






,8 


1.487 


.521 








.454 


.053 








19 


.443 


.520 








.705 


.105 


.154 






20 


.501 


.378 








.585 


.630 


.231 






21 


.110 


.568 








1.149 


.473 








22 


.278 


.473 








.739 


.263 








23 


.166 


.662 








.437 


.420 








24 


.056 


.284 








.328 


.473 








25 


.110 


.378 


.080 






.772 


.473 








26 


.111 


.047 










.158 








27 




.047 








.055 


.105 








28 




.142 








.492 


.105 








29 












.164 










30 




.047 








.109 










31 


.056 




















32 


.056 


.047 








.055 










33 












.055 


.053 








34 














.053 




% 


- 


35 






















36 






















37 






















38 






















39 






















40 






















41 






















42 






















43 






















44 






















45 






















i " 






















47 






















JP"" 


20.691 


8.034 


0.080 






6927.400 


3228.828 


58.122 


1.550 




>Hth 


13.93 


17.25 


25.00 






6.14 


6.03 


7.46 


5.35 





Table 8. Stratified mean number per tow (untransfonned) for black sea bass 
length frequency intervals for regions 1-5, Massachusetts inshore 
bottom trawl survey, spring and autumn, 1982. 



SPRING 



AUTUMN 



' 










Regions 










.ngth 












• 










cm) 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


i 






















2 














.288 








3 












_ 32.751 


32.583 








4 












301.120 


111.209 . 


4.264. 


. 


. 


5 












301.096 


146.149 


2.468 






6 












61.602 


_45_. 011 


4.851 






7 












37.792 


_ 3.096 








e 




.. 


.. 





. _ — 


16.459 


1.413 








9 






















| ,0 


_. 





. — . 


— ... 


.._ _._..... 













11 


- - 





_._. . — . 





- - 




— - ■ 








12 




. . - . 





— , — 




- 


— 




- 




13 




t 






- - 


.139 


• -— 








14 


" 




. 15 


- 


. 




16 
17 










__ __ _ _. . _ . 




*•" 










IB 






- 


















19 








.. . 


.._. 












20 




.048 


















21 


.055 






... .. 














» 




.378 


.123 




_ 












23 


.080 


.190 


. 
















24 


.295 


.520 


















25 




.569 


.154 
















26 


.080 


.332 










.053 








27 




.425 








.139 


.148 








28 




.095 








.329 


.450 








29 




.095 










.100 








30 


.080 


.047 










.196 










31 




.142 








.139 


.345 










32 




.569 




















33 




.238 




















34 


.080 


.286 


.080 






% 


.048 






- 


35 




.190 










.096 








1 

36 


.135 


.142 










...196 








37 














.148 








38 




.047 










.053 










39 














.144 










40 




.048 


















41 














.048 








42 






















43 






















44 




.095 


















« 




.047 


















46 


.080 






_ r __ 















! 47 























-— 41 






















I 








- - 


















• 























'■ 



Appendix Table 8. (Cont.) 



SPRING 



AUTUMN 















Regions 










,e 
i 


ngth 


1 


2 


3 


H 


5 


• 
1 


5 


' 3 


4 


5 


c 






— 
















.j- 








_ — __ 


_ — . 


• — 


._. 


— - - 


- ■ 





. — 




9 


— — 


— — . . --_ 





— 


— . 


- — - — 


* 




. 






__5o 

_ 1 









- 






— . . 


.077 
,077 














. 2 

•> 


- - 


— - -- 





— - 


- 







.077 








4 






rrzi" 


~'~" 


1 _ . . 




. j _ . 






. 




5 


- 




— . 


----- 




- 


-* _ _ ^ - 


- 








6 






. 




._...._. 




- 


.077 






| 7 


.055 




. - 






.. 


— 






- 


£ 














- -■ 










9 
























6o 
















.077 








1 




- - 




















2 
























3 




- -■ - 






- 














- 4 


— 




















-5 























6 




-_ . 


. 




. 












7 




_ - 



















8 

























9 






_ 


















7o 
























i 
























2 
























3 
























4 
























5 






















6 






















7 






- 
















8 






















9 






















80 






















l 
























2 
























3 




_ . . 




















4 




_ 


















5 






















6 

I 







. . .._„.. 












. 




7 




■ - - 


- -- 
















U 


0.940 


4.503 


0.357 






751.568 


341.773 


11.968 








ength 


30.79 


28.70 


25.97 






4.78 


4.80 


6.62 







M 



fable 9. 



Stratified mean number per tow (untransformed) for tautog 

length frequency intervals for regions 1-5, Massachusetts inshore 

bottom trawl survey, spring and autumn, 1982. 



SPRING 



AUTUMN 













Regions 










igth 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


• 

1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


i 


- 









— 


— 


— — 








i — — - 

2 

3 


— — 


_ 


— 




4 
5 






• - 


..__. -- 


— 





— — — 





.069 


- 


6 




_.0J&. 












_ . 


.103 




7 






— -- 


■ — — — 


— 


.... .. .. 


- - 





.•103 




8 
9 


.055 


— — — 




— .. — 


— 




* 


.... 






10 














,158 




_ 




11 












..... 


.053 




_. . _ 




12 


.056 












•105 








13 


.078 


•0 4 _8. 




■ 






.100 








14 








15 




.189 












. _ 






16 


.056 




— 


- 






.053 


, .. 






17 






















18 
























19 




.047 










.053 


, 








20 




.047 








.055 


.263 










21 












.055 


.210 










22 


.166 


.047 










.153 










_23 


.056 




.... 


















2i 


.167 




















25 


.055 




















26 


.111 


.189 
















. 


27 


.279 


.047 










.053 








2B 


.055 


.142 


















29 




.095_ 










^ 








30 


.334 _ 










.070 










31 






















32 


.334 


.095 


















33 




__'_Q95 








. _. 










3 < 


.444 


. .238 




_ .038 


._ 


» 




.. 




- 


1 

35 


.502 


.142 










.105 








36 


.554 


.284 










"'. 








37 


.334 


.095 








_ 










36 


.446 


.095 


_ 









.105 








39 


.390 


.142 










.105 








40 


.669 


.426 










.105 








41 


.334 


.520 




.038 














42 


.502 


.521 


















43 


.390 


.425 


















44 


.333 


.521 


















45 


.446 


.379 










.053 








46 


.502 


.284 


















47 


.390 
.389 


.236 
.426 




















th 






- 

















Appendix Table 9. (Cont.) 



SPRING 



AUTUMN 



Regions 



agth 
a) 



,5o 

L 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
B 
9 

6o 

i 

2 
3 

, 4 

-5 
6 

7 

8 

9 

7o 

2 
3 

4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
80 
1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 



?th 



• 557. 
.834 



.142 



.22 3 

.334 

". 557 

. 167 

.223 



.056 

.111 
.111 



^32. 
.142 



.055 
.139 

.175 
.301 



,095 
..142 
.095 
.047 
.095 

.048 



.105 



.120 
.120 



11.601 
41.52 



6.959 
40.92 



0.076 
37.50 



1.089 
49.51 



1.776 
25.51 



0.275 
6.13 



Appendix 

Table 10. 


Stratified mean number per 


• tow (untrans formed) for ocean pout 








length frequency intervals for regions 1-5, Massachusetts inshore 






bottom trawl survey, spring and aut'jnn, 1982. 








SPRING AUTUMN 






. 




Regions 






mgth 
cm) 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


■ 

1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


_j 

















- - — 


.038 
.041 




_2 













— - ■ 




3 












4 












5 






.076 




. 


. 




6 







.076 







7 




.041 




8 




.041 






9 

10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 


- - - 


- • - 




.090 


.196 
.293 


» 


----- ■■- - ■ 


...•943 
_.07.2 


.045 

.045 

.308 

1.116 

1.588 

1.905 






.045 


.020 




.045 
.226 


.333 




1.883 


■ --- — 




.213 


.908 




• 413 


.871 


_.. 16 








1.020 


.472 








1.26.0 


.187 


17 


.022 


_____ 




1.657 


_tl66 





. 




.753 


.199 


18 


.022 






.747 


.455 








,594 




19 








1.090 
1.315. 


.575 
.259 


— 




• 


.263 
.917 


.211 


20 


.044 




,211 


21 








.757 


.10 4_ 








1.180 


.873 


22 








_l_tll8_. 


.283 


... 








1.867 


.776 


-23 


.066 


-■ 




1.387 


.374 
.340 

.101 
_. _i878_ 
.382 
.868 


— . — ..,-.- 


... ... 


.072 


2.132 
1.963 

1.689 

1.378 

.991 

1.557 


.922 


.24 

25 

26 

27 




1.464 


.680 


.044 






1.980 


.880 






1.878 


.272 


.044 
.131 


r 




1.591 
1.682 


.217 


28 




.527 


29 


.066 






.1.410 


.68.1 






.072 


2.201 


.231 


30 


.335 






1.814 


.754 








4.721 


1.352 


31 


.175 




.145 


1.447 


. .785 








4.213 


.745 


32 


.197 




.141 


.836 


1.187 






.072 


4.907 


.751 


33 


.109 






1.607 


.843 








3.217 


.593 


34 


.153 
.131 






1.368 


.__.J+68 ' 
.405 


--■ 


— 


__ .....072 


2,383 
2.750 


- .553 


35 




_._^U22_ 


J759_ 


.332 


36 


.175 
.131" 






1.204 
1.214 


_.1J+9Q. 
1.325 






... 


2.110 
1.786 


.682 


37 






.699 


38 


.087 




.043 


.939 


.663 








1.368 


.617 


39 


.153 






1.084 


1.564 








1.771 


.376 


40 


•219 




.141 


1.411 


2.. 462 








1.777 


.929 


41 


.066 




.141 


1.063 


1.973 








1.400 


.447 


42 


.153 




.072 


1.017 


2.657 








1.070 


.332 


43 


.175 






_.493_ 


1.467 








1.146 


.447 


44 


.175 






1.026 


3.529 








1.119 


.060 


45 


.109 






. 1.1JW 


4.263 








.891 


.768 


L-46 


.153 






1.460 


6.434 








.738 


,376 


47 


.189 






.679 


2.792 








.828 


.248 


igth 


.240 






1.084 


3.111 








.693 


.020 




— - - 





- — 




- - - 











Appendix Table 10 . ( Cont . ) 



SPRING 



AUTUMN 



Regions 



Sgth 
cm) 



' 3 



9 

5o 
i 

2 
3 
4 
5 
i> 
7 
8 
9 

6o 

] 

2 
3 

-• 4 

— J 

6 

7 

e 

9 

7o 
i 

2 

3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

8o 
i 

2 
3 
4 
i 

6 

7 



>gth 



•066. 

.153 

..109. 

.022 

.160 

.284 

.259 

.044 

.160 
.022 



.022 
.055 
•1Q9 

.109 



.055 



.072 



.214 
.072 
.286 
.145 
.284 
.072 
.143 

• 286. 

.141. 
-•_214 

.141 

.072 

•.212 

". 141 
.212 

_• IJtl 

.141 



.141 

.141 
.141 



_._.J94 

_2^284 

.4.021 

.2.8.99 
1.518 

3.378 

_3JiD 
2.548 
2.293 
2.823 
1^844 

.l_-_ 594 

2.911 

1,011 

-88-8- 

„_^7.B4. 
_ .659 
._355. 

_.iip. 

.241 
.613 
.653 
_ .244 
.438 
. 206 

_.__. 283 

• 246 
..205 
•200 
.121 
.202 

.082 
.082 

.158 
.076 

,041 
.038 



3.245 
8.582 
6.005 
5.050 
5.563 

_6.594 
7 . 794 

8.174 
5.534 
6.370 
5.685 
7.647 
4.542 
2.,.274 

2,456 

2.10JZ 

JL.576 

1...172 

1.376 

.337 

.277 

.130 

_.097 

_^Q9_4 

.157 

,020 
,094. 
_.0_66 
.149 



.063 
.031 



.072 



,512_ 

.368. 

.302 

.216 

.206 

.417 

.150 
.115 
.090 
.035 
.035 
.076 
.080 
.080 
.070 



.090 
.080 
.090 



.051 
.417 ... 
.105 
.105 

,165 
.125 
.020 



.105 



.045 
.045 



w 



Appendix Table 10- (Cont. ) 



SPRING 



AUTUMN 













Regions 










jngth 
(cm) 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


• 

1 


2 


3 


4 


5 

















- — 


— - 


— 
















.. 





._ . 


- 










- - - 





- •---• 






— 


— • - 




. . _._. 





._ 


- - - 


— 




- 


- - - 


._ 


. . _ 


• 


- - 





— 




— 






- 





— 


.. 


..__ - 


_ _ 


... . . 




- 






• 


9 





- - — • ■■ 


,141 


.038 














?0 


_ 


■ -. - 


— .._ __ - 

















J 

2 

.3 

4 

























" 





.038 


. 




.-• 








5 


_ 


._. — . - _. 


— .__ 


— 


.6 




- — - 





— 


^ 




- 








7 






- - — - 

















.8 






















.9 








. ... 


- 




-■ 








lQo 






















1 








- 














2 






- 
















3 






-- 
















4 






..._.._... 


. 


-•--■- 












5 
6 






















7 






- 


. . . 


- 












B 






















9 






















llo 

1 






- 
















1 

2 














. . 








3 






















4 






m 
















5 






. _ „ 
















6 






. . _. ii 

















7 






. 


- - — 














8 






















1 9 


















/ 




12 o 






















l 






















2 






















.3 






















4 










• 












: 






















.7 

tal 








----- 














5.191 




4.388 


82.992 


137.889 






0.478 


65.823 


21.620 


kngth 


43.19 




62.59 . 


44.14 


50.90 






29.61 


31.54 


29.54 



T* 



Appendix 
Table 11. 



Stratified mean number per tow (untransformed) for northern searobin 
length frequency intervals for regions 1-5, Massachusetts inshore 
bottom trawl survey, spring and autumn, 1982. 



SPRING 



AUTUMN 



( 










Regions 










Length 
(cm) 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


• 

1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


_._l 

2 







— 





— - 


. . 








— 




3 

4 
5 
6 
7 
6 

* 

9 





_ 











14. 374 
41.352 
31.366 
" 9.829 
~ 3.033" 


2.742" 

.-8.465 

7.751 

9.308 

.297 

.263 


1.169 
1^807 
2.165 
7.911 
2.326 


.034 


■ 































10 
11 
12 


0.022 
0.186 
1.233 


- -■ — 


0.080 
0.877 


— _ 


— 


2.555 


- 







.105 








13 

14 

-.- 15 

16 

. 17 

_ 18 

. 19 

20 


0.827 

0.797 
0.164 

0.160 
0.325 
1.443 


0.048 
6.618 


3.888 




> 


.055 
.131 


.053 
.053 

.053 


■ 






2.542 
1.833 

0.551 
0.478 

0.947 
2.889 


— 




0.035" 


< 




.21 

22 

23 

-24 

25 
26 


3_.590_ 
9.167 
10.741 

10.757 

5.998 
5.594 


43.818 

94.444 

178. 766 

178 . 951 

239.319 
267.058 


11.554 

23.578 
22.402 

11.491 


. .. _ . 


• 


.077 

.712 
.164 

.219 

_ .,164 
.398 


.053 
.053 
.263 

1.728 

2.665 
3.349 


.213 

.213 
.213 


.038 
.038 

.114 
.041 




5.835 
4.571 


0.035 


.050 


27 


3.422 


119.558 


2.179 






.949 


2.943 


.213 


.156 




28 


2.020 


84.000 


J.. 373 






- .493 


1.989 


.106 






29 


0.890 


35.428 


Q..223 






.757 


1.993 


.106 






30 


1.281 


96.534 








.791 


1.185 


.106 


.079 




31 


0.223 


33.006 


0.549 






.216 


.559 


.106 






32 


0.135 


48.272 


0.071 






.388 


.311 


.213 


.034 




33 




8.180 








.194 


.297 








34 




10.968 


P.080_ 






.124 


• .105 




.038 


- 


35 




0.240 








. 13.9 










36 




0.192 


















37 






JL£73. 
















38 








. 














39 






















40 






















41 






















« 






















43 






















44 






















45 






















46 












_....___. 










47 























|»tal 


58.973 


1445.399 


98.469 


0.070 




108.480 


46.475 


16.866 


0.574 


0.155 


i L ength 


23.42 


25.73 


22.12 


22.00 




7.70 


13.88 


6.40 


25.77 


15.80 



npueuu-LX 

Table 



12. Stratified mean number per tow (untransformed) for longhorn sculp in 
length frequency intervals for regions 1-5, Massachusetts inshore 
bottom trawl survey, spring and autrjnn, 1982. 



SPRING 



AUTUMN 



Regions 



ngth 














• 










cm) 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


j 








_... 








- 


• 


.038 




2 










. J 


— 









4 
5 


- . 




_ 


— 





- ... . 


— . _- . 


" 






6 
7 




_. 


: — 


— 


0.061 


- - — 











8 






, 0.141_„_ 




1.080 








.082 




9 








0.038 


2.712 








.041 




10 








0.161 


1.557 








.041 


.211 


,1 






0.141 ~ 


_0 '. 041 


0.843 






.072 


.038 


.211 


12 






0.080 


6.079 


0.849 






.072 


.045 


1.135 


13 








" 0.035 


2 . 314 






.232 


.304 


3.185 


|4 








0.131 


2.686 




1 


.710 


.800 


7.172 


15 






0.072 


0.297 


4.771 






. 362 


.735 


8.212 


16 








0.746 


7.614 






.232 


.539 


4.217 


1 V 

17 








1.560 


7.285 




" 


.449 


.416 


1.492 


IB 






0.145 


2.213 


6.025 






.377 


.379 


.743 


19 






0.072 


2.470 


4.123 






.145 


.296 


1.961 


20 


0.080 




0.297 


3.425 


6.947 






.217 


.128 


5.927 


21 


0.306 




0.763 


2.370 


3.683 






.072 


.213 


5.535 


22 


0.852 


0.048 


0.971 


1.831 


4.740 






.304 


.650 


4.257 


- 23 


1.144 




1.400 


1.820 


6.950 








.426 


2.387 


t 2K 


1.115 




1.429 


. 1.426 


6.679 






.362 


.254 


1.846 


25 


0.714 


0.096 


2.536 


1.314 


.9.034 






.159 


.123 


2.188 


26 


1.086 


0.189 


2 . 694 


1.577 


9.042 






.290 


.329 


2.415 


27 


1.056 


0.288 


3.045 


_.?_._052 


6.527 






.217 


.121 


1.544 


28 


0.867 


0.334 


.2.254 


_ 0,831 


4.597 






.: .290 


.108 


1.435 


29 


0.594 


0.334 


1.149 


J.. 619 


4.076 






.217 




.489 


30 


1.435 


0.287 


2.399 


1.480 


3.367 






.217 


.207 


1.387 


31 


0.430 


0.238 


1.710 


0.814 


1.104 










.241 


32 


0.350 


0.384 


1.764 


. 432 


0.640 








.041 


.031 


33 


0.350 


0.192 


0.853 


. 244 


0.242 












34 




0.048 


0.565_ 


" 0.121 


% 










- 


35 


0.055 


0.048 


0.505 


0.093 














36 




0.048 


0.245 
















37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 

44 
45 
46 
47 


0.055 


- 


0.174 




0.033 










.105 




10.488 


2.533 


25.406 


29.219 


109.582 






5.000 


6.354 


58.325 




8th 


26.60 


29.53 


27.25 


22.87 


21.26 






20.11 


18.80 


19.23 



W 1 



Appendix 
Table 13 



Stratified mean number per tow (untransformed) for yellowtail 
length frequency intervals for regions 1-5, Massachusetts inshore 
bottom trawl survey, spring and autumn, 1982. 



SPRING 



AUTUMN 



1 










Regi 


ons 










ength 
(cm) 


l 


2 


3 


4 


5 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


_ i 

2 
3 

4 












— 




■ 


— 




— 






- 


- - - 










- — — 









- 


. 


- 


5 
6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

.11 

. 12 

13 

14 

— 15 . 

__. . 16 
17 



















,072 
.228 


.038 
.079 










.038 











.038 

.052 

.247 


.063 

.031 

.. ,126 
...182_ 
_._08.4 
.230 


.099 








... 





.063 


— 




.144 


.126 




.113 


.141 




.130 


_ • 072 _ 


75 41 


.293 

.917 






.D72 


.041 


-218 


^ 




.228 


.041 


1.724 


18 






.185 


.131 _ 


.094 






.284 


.164 


1.928 


19 






.551 


.*2.67.__ 


.229 






.301 


.366 


2.871 . 


20 


.022 






.368. 


? 694 






.420 


.648 


2.500 


21 






.116 


.585 


.555 






.652 


.617 


1.914 


22 






.286 


•546 


1.768 






.357 


.451 


1.305 


- -J3 


.022 _. 




.473 


._,_5_21 


1.958 


. ._ 


. . 


.736 


.122 


.514 


-24 






.665 


.1.514 


1.980 




... 


1.139 


.163 


.635 


25 
26 

27 

28 


.022 




.918 

.784 


.880 

.1.149 
1-.1.50 


2.373 
2.188 

2.903 
1.954 


•- -- •■ 


• - ■ -- 


1.531 
2.018 
1.719 
2.172 


,196 
.199 
.162 
.635 


1.278 


.066_ 
• Q66 
.044 




1.570 




.549 


1.800 




1-147 


4.623 


29 

30 


.204 
.044 




.922 


1.554 


1.839 
4 . 742_ 


... 


.. 


2.004 
2.313 


.695 
.868 


2.818 




1.216 


1.025 


2.344 


31 


.044 




1.504 


1.022 


3,044_ 






1.661 


.462 


1.342 


32 
33 


.044 
.109 


— . — — 


2.351 

2^8.64 „ 


.801 


. 4 1 946. 
3.834_ 





.. . 


1.976 
1.141 


.867 
,726 


.790 


_ J12R 


.370 


34 


.066 




2.946 


.834 


5T.104.. 






.855 


.371 


.882 


35 
36 






2.716 


.815 
.893 


5.897 
5.384 


- ■ • 


— - 


.739 
.449 


.160 
.125 


.365 




2.297 


.826 


1 37 






2.803 


.573 


4.555 






.159 


.038 


.457 


38 






1.4.06. 


.420 


3.355 






.431 „ 


.080 


.281 


39 






.788 


.498 


2.018 






.072 




.157 


40 






.505 


.416 


2.605 






.072 




.114 


41 






.504. 


.041 


1.336 






.217 




.105 


42 
43 


— 




.141 . 


..209 

_ ... 041 . 


.691 
.208 






.072 
.087 




.105 




.214 




44 








.082 


.033 












45 








. Q41 


.356 












46 










.104 












47 






- ■ • • — 





.084 
.115 





... 


.072 
.072 






a 






















*gth 




• 





— - 















Appendix Table 13. (Cont.) 



1 








SPRING 










AUTUMN 








Regions 










;ngth 

r>m 1 


1 


2 


3 


** 


5 


• 

1 


2 


' 3 


4 


5 


>■ 


t_. 

























_.. z 


— 





__. 











. . .... __ 


— - - 


. 


- 




9 


. 











'.084 






...... 


- 


- 


5o 








i 








.031 


2 







— , 




4 
5 


• - 


■ - 





— --- 


.. .___.__._ ^_ 


- — _ : 


... 


• — — 






.. 6 


— . 









7 
8 






.... 










- 








9 

6o 




- - 




- — - • - 


— 














2 


.... 


-- 






— 














3 


■ 


_ 


.: 





. 














6 
























7 










.. _ 












8 






_ 


_ __ — . 














9 




... . - . — 


- . ... 


_. 














7o 

1 






■ 








- 








2 






















3 










_. 












4 






_ . 


. - .... 


— 




~ . — _. 









5 




_ 


. . 


. ... 


. 






. . . 


. - 




6 




. 


.— . . 


-. -- — _ 


._.- 












7 
g 






- - ----- 


_.. 














9 


















, 




8o 


- 


• 




. .- 














2 






















3 






— 


.... 














4 






















H 

a. 
















- 










• 


• - 
















1 


0.750 




29.136 


19.679 


67.964 






24.255 


8.275 


35.387 




ngth 


29.32 




32.44 


28.68 


32.11 






28.58 


27.39 


25.23 



II 



Table 14. Stratified mean number per tow (untransformed) for winter flounder 
length frequency intervals for regions 1-5, Massachusetts inshore 
bottom trawl survey, spring and autumn, 1982. 



SPRING 



AUTUMN 



- 










Regions 










ngth 
cm) 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


* 

1 


2 


3 


4 


5 




J 

2 










. — 


— 


- - - -- 


- 


- - 


- 


3 

4 
5 
















. 





.106 


.076 

.191 
.340 
.034 
.038 
.038 


• 


6 






.076 


- - 




J 


.055 






.191 








8 




.047 




.166 


.185 

1.043 


.139 
.. .161 






9 


.109 

•263 . 
.900 


.095 




.827 
.710 




10 


___!_PM_ 




.126 


11 


.154 


.1.696. _ 




12 


1.115, 


.190. 




_ .1.334 .. 


_2,264 










.099 


13 


1.706 


.142 




1.562 


3.243 


.055 






.276 


1.263 


14 


1.242 


.286 


.754 


1.462 


2.026 




' .053 




.435 


3.377 




... 15 


2.229 


.382 


.212 


1.334 


2.696 


.120 


.048 




1.793 


2.051 




__ )6 


.962 


.617 




1.522 


3.100 


.668 




.072 


6.175 


3.151 




■ 
... . 17 


.660 


.285 


.080 


1.797 


,2.954 


• 941 


.048 


.077 


7.594 


4.788 




18 


1.345 


.714 


.239 


1.416 


4.094 


1.243 


•1° 5 


.744 


6.767 


5.555 




10 


.819 
1.493 . 


.190 
.76Z 


.159 
.292 


1.097_ 

. .1.384- 


... .3.170 
_4.225 


1.340 




.179 . 
.154 


9.033 
6.640 


5.833 


20 


1.0.01 


.048. 


7.730 




, -21 
11 


•949__ 
. l._32?__ 
2.250 

2.t_223 


.... .712. 
.715 


.542 


1.987 

._. 1..796 

2.957 


.5.830 
4.133 
3.218 


.393 

.131 
.208 


.148 


.816 

.430 

2.203 

.650 


5.250 
4.427 
3.560 
4.962 


7.563 
6.593 


22 


_._5_73_._ 

1?047_ 


.989 


7.224 


"7 

-24 


.353 


. 2.521 


3.162 


.164 


.053 


5.335 


25 


2..933. 


1.148. 


1.272 


_...3.,164 


2.342 


.704 




1.388 


5.227 


4.789 


26 


3.292 


1.863 


JL«096_. 


1.972 


2.348 


.262 


.100 


3.028 


5.624 


8.824 


27 


3.464 


2.048 


.725 


1.662 


2.373 


.157 


.053 


1.174 


5.302 


4.477 


28 


3.116 


2.477 


1.569 


1.236 


3.317 


.157 


.210 


2.803 


5.894 


4.150 


29 


4.001 


1.718 


1.255 


1.204 


1.485 


.186 


.053 


2.940 


5.435 


5.207 


30 


4.786 


1.863 


2.810 


1 • 519 


3.630 


.296 


.148 


3.189 


4.475 


4.407 


31 


2.224.. 


__..764 


1,121, 


._1,460_ 


....2.094 


.277 


.048 


4.430 


2.820 


5.832 


32 


2.048 


1.665 


1.007 


.972 


1.621 


.044 


.053 


3.604 


2.261 


2.889 


33 


2.107 


1.048 


2.199 


1.125 


3.328 


.077 


.100 


2.354 


1.181 


2.487 


34 


2.215 


1.097 


1.511 


.922 


2.68-7 


.087 




2.531 


1.466 


_ 3.416 


35 


2.781 


1.190 


1.495 


1376 


1.829 


.022 




1.526 


1.073 


1.376 


36 


2.541 
2.364 


.858 

.428 


1.301 


.661 
.797 


1.294 
.766 


.022, 
.022 


-• 


.801 
.251 


.553 
.508 


2.101 


37 


1.442 


.531 


38 


2.042 


.618 


.326 
.246 


.699 
.417 


.818 
.909 


.022 




.391 
.179 


.305 
.111 


.468 


39 


1.424 


.523 


.140 


40 


1.832 


.142 


.618 


.530 


.585 






.284 


.315 • 


.289 


T 41 


.295 


.239 


.123 


.156 


.567 






.956 


.086 




- 42 


.546 


.334 


.159 


.247 


.063 






.072 


.080 




43 


.379 


.096 


.123 


.293 








.072 


.038 




44 


.495 


.096 


.397 


.159 










.045 




45 


.353 


.190 


.154 


.082 














46 


.273 
.055 


.190 
.048 


.043_. 
.080 










.141 


.128 




47 








- "> 


.055 


.143 




















*th 




• 


- 


. 






- . 









I 



Appendix Table 14. (Cont.) 



SPRING 



AUTUMN 



Regions 



length 
Xoa) — 



5o 
l 

2 

. 3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
B 
9 

6o 
1 

2 
3 

. 4 

-5 
6 

7 

e 

9 

7o 

i 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

8o 
1 

2 
3 
4 

5 
6 

7 



.055 
.219 



047 



.080 



.082 
.041 



048 



.045 



ength 



65.541 
27.96 



27.685 
28.49 



24.926 
30.44 



45.612 
23.32 



77.399 
23.70 



8.900 
20.91 



1.267 
25.38 



37.547 
29.67 



100.602 
23.40 



112.072 
24.19 



laDie -l°« Stratified mean number per tow (untransformed) for summer flounder 
length frequency intervals for regions 1-5, Massachusetts inshore 
bottom trawl survey, spring and autumn, 1982. 



SPRING 



AUTUMN 



1 • 










Regions 










j sn 

1- 


gth 
m) 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


• 

1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


1 










— • 




- - 


... 


- • - 




2 





. 


... — . 






3 

A 
5 

A 







_ _ 


• - 


- --- 


- ■ 


— - - 






- 


7 
8 




--■•—■ 


— — — - - 


■ ■ 




-■ 













9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 





- — — 










— 


















— * 


- 


, 










— _ _ 





- 






zz 


_ ._. . - 








15 




. 




















16 




- - — — 


- - 








*-■ 










17 




■ 




















18 






-- - 


















19 
























20 
























21 
























22 
23 






■ 



















-24 

25 










— ■ 
















. . _ 






26 
























...27 












.139 


. 










28 
























29 














.048 


.072 








30 


.055 




•154 








.096 










31 


.055 




.308 


















32 


.245 __ 


_.. -I 42 


.. .388 






.070 






.034 






33 


.160 


.095 


.458 


















34 


.409 


_ ..047 


._._.150_._ 




» 


.055 






.034 


- 


35 


.516 
.455 


.095 


.308 


-—.-■ 




.109 
.219 


.244 
.253 


.072 






36 


.048 ~ 


" .766 




I 37 


.460 




.473 






.238 


.048 




,069 




38 


.574 


.095 


.786. 






.164 


.388 




.172 


.050 




39 


.301 




.696„ 






.310 


.450 




.210 






40 


.300 




.861 


.045 




.429 


.096 


.154 


.144 




41 




... 


.080 


. 




.628 


.196 


.077 


.069 






42 


.110 


.047 


.304 - 






.235 


.096 


.077 


.213 






43 


.165 




.304 






.264 


.096 




.317 






44 






.234 






.402 


.048 




.073 




45 


.110 


.048 


.239 






.320 


.096 




.103 




46 


.055 




.. ...080 






.164 






.034 




47 












.175 




.106 


.034 






■ — 4) 


.136 










.077 






.038 




'gth 








- 















J 



UJM 



Appendix Table 15. (Cont.) 



SPRING 



AUTUMN 



Regions 



jngth 



? 

5o 
1 

2 
3 

A 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

6o 
j 

2 
3 

.- 4 

.5 
6 

7 

8 

9 

70 
1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

80 
1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 



I 

igth 

— ■ 



056 

■JLLCF 

080 



.055 



.053 



.080 

_.1.59 
.080 



.034 
.034 
.034 

.034 



.154 



.082 



.048 



055 



.048 



4.407 
38.42 



0.760 
41.34 



7.062 
38.68 



0.045 
40.00 



4.133 
41.03 



2.208 
38.52 



0.559 
39.80 



1.682 
41.91 



0.050 
38.00 



Table 



16. Stratified mean number per tow (imtransformed) for American Plaice 
length frequency intervals for regions 1-5, Massachusetts inshore 
bottom trawl survey, spring and autumn, 1982. 



SPRING 



AUTUMN 



Regions 



> 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


• 

1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


l 

2 
3 




._ __ 





— _ . 


































4 


















.070 




5 


















.035 




6 










.100 












7 






— 




.453 
2.825 








.035 


.105 


8 








9 








.221 


2.199 












10 








.271 


5.616 








.045 


.305 


11 








•I 25 


2.185 








.186 


.810 


12 








.080 


2.537 








.618 


1.722 


13 








...•176 


.717 








2.079 


4.088 


14 








.161 


2.603 








2.822 


2.955 


15 








1.145 


7.496 








2.781 


2.736 


16 








3.000 


11.773 








1.516 


1.022 


17 






.072 


2.843 


11.108 








.398 


.645 


18 








3.640 


11.437 








.477 


2.344 


,9 








3.016 


9.180 








1,204 


2.468 


20 








1.828 


23.203 








3.766 


3.979 


21 








1.377 


19.069 








3.480 


2.771 


22 








1.071 


16.090 








2.753 


3.396 


< 23 








1.708 


14.163 








3.389 


3.792 


2i 








1.919 


12.462 








1.058 


4.544 




25 








1.974 


9.898 








.632 


4.246 


26 

i 








1.743 


8.415 








.673 


4.142 


27 






.072 


1.445 


6.748 








.979 


3.574 


28 








1.810 


4.679 








.762 


1.614 


29 








.909 


2.584 








.572 


1.177 




30 








1.138 


4.833 








.718 


1.807 


31 








.381 


1.664 








.978 


.952 


32 








.391 


1.821 








.361 


.510 




33 








.824 


1.455 








.367 


.886 


34 








.243 


1.720 








.301 


.485 


35 






.072 


..-^292 


.697 








.115 


.752 


36 








.303 


.896 








.150 


.105 


37 








.231 


.537 








.035 


.632 


38 








.076 


.924 








.035 


.636 


39 








.035 


.210 










- .311 


40 








.105 


.741 










.231 


41 








.090 


.171 












42 










.889 










.105 




43 










.380 










.040 




44 








.045 


.339 














45 










.253 










.040 


46 








.090 












.020 


47 








.105 












.125 


-ML 










.031 










.051 


h 























Appendix Table 16 . ( Cont . ) 



SPRING 



AUTUMN 



Regions 




9 

5o 

1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

6o 
] 

2 

3 

- 4 

5 
6 

7 

8 

9 

7o 
l 

2 
3 
4 
5 

6 
7 
8 
9 
80 
1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 



,e ngth 



072 



.290 
33.50 



.QJ15 
...03_5_ 

.140 



35.021 
22.58 



169 
060 

060 



205.388 
21.35 



' 3 



.105 



045 



.105 



.020 



33.437 
20.68 



60.351 
22.50 






Table 17. Stratified mean number per tow (untransformed) for witch flounder 
length frequency intervals for regions 1-5, Massachusetts inshore 
bottom trawl survey, spring and autumn, 1982. 



SPRING 



AUTUMN 



Regions 



ngth 














• 










cm) 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


2 


- 




— — — 


— ■ — - 


- - — 





- - 


— 


- 




3 

4 


— 


— . _ . 




5 
6 

7 


- — ■ 





— — — 





— - 


... ... . 


. ... 


— . .. . 




- 


.8 
9 







- 







— ■ 


• — 


■ 








10 














. 










11 
12 
13 
14 


._ 


.. . . _ 


- - — 





- 


. . 


. — 














.020 




15 




- 


.._. . 


— 
















~ 16 






. ....... 


— 








i ., 






17 








. _ 


- 


— 








• 


18 











.020 












19 








. 














20 










.020 












21 


. 






. 


.020 










.020 


22 






















23 










.020 


— 


..... 


•■ ~- 




.020 




-24 

























25 








.. _ 




_ . 












26 
















- 




.040 


27 










.124 










.020 


28 
29 

















■i 




.020 
.120 


30 




















.160 




31 








- 










- 


.200 
.080 




32 






















33 




















.200 


34 














• 




s 035 


- .120 




35 




















.100 




36 










.084 














37 




















.040 


38 




















.120 




39 




















.040 




40 










.020 










.271 




41 










.169 










.040 


1 42 










.169 








.035 


.020 


43 










.169 












44 








.045 


.169 












45 








.035 














46 










.199 










.105 


47 








.01+5 










.045 






M* 


■ — ^_ 


















.020 




11 


•Kh 








- 















Appendix Table 17. (Cont.) 



SPRING 



AUTUMN 



Regions 



1 ength 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


• 

1 


2 


' 3 


4 


5 


| 


t__ 








_ 
















_ 9 
5o 

_.l 








- 


— 


.337 
.169 
.169 





» 


- 


- 


.105 
.105 






.... 


.105 




. 2 
3 


- 1- 








— 


....084- 
.084 










.031 




4 
5 


- — 


-i - — 






.169 


■ 


. 










... 


• -= — 


• P.31 


! 6 
7 


^ _ - 


1 






" .084 










. .02Q 


8 
9 




-■-• 






.169 




— ■ 






.168 


6o 




















,105 


] 








.. 












.031 




2 
3 


-■- 





- 


















- 4 

5 
6 


-— — 


•-• 


- 


















7 




! 


..... 


















8 




i 
















* 


9 








... 
















7o 








- • 
















2 
























3 
























' 4 






_. _ _. 


. 





. .. 


. 










5 




. 




_ _ _. . ._ 
















6 
























7 






• 
















e 
























9 
























80 






















2 






















3 






















4 
























5 
























6 


_ 


. 


. 


. 
















7 
*» a 

al 










— - 




















0.125 


2.446 








0.115 


2.476 




ength 








45.36 


46.15 








41.52 


40.19 



— ■ 



Appendix 

Table 18. Stratified mean number per tow (untransformed) for wmdowpane 

length frequency intervals for regions 1-5, Massachusetts inshore 
bottom trawl survey, spring and autumn, 1982. 



SPRING 



AUTUMN 



Regions 



1 n 

' CI 


5th 
n) 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


• 

1 


2 


3 


4 


5 




5 


•10?- 





.308 _ 





— 


.219 . 
.656 


— - 


_1.386 
-.3.571 


.034 


- 






,050 




e 












..339. 




872 


.041 




9 


"-32*JL 




.154 
.154 
.308 


... .038 


.031 
.152 


.358 
.164 
.290 
.235 


. 0.96__ 


.177 


.038 
.076 

.076 
.034 
.079 




_. _vo 


.109_ 

.078 
.233 
.393 




.149 


11 




.050 


12 


.143 




.397 


13 




1.355 


.099 


14 


.047 




.090 _ 


.099 


15 


.21+0 


■i 


1.361 


. • 041 


.031 


.055 


.096 




.121 


.050 


J6 

17 


.055 
.318 


i 

j 

i 


.319 
.080- 


. .082 
.041 


_ .303 
-.451 


.022 


-■ - 


- 


.082 




18 


.215 




.313 


.082 


.765 


. 077 


- _ 








19 


.271 




.308 


.076 


.314 


.022 


... 


• 


.079 


.059 




20 
21 


.022 
.166 


.096 


2.889 
1.435 


.041 
-.079 


.722 
.420 


.219 
.693 


.144 


.077 


.187 


.291 




22 


.110 


.047 


5.344 


.041 


.312 


.481 




.183 


.156 


.390 




23 


.303 


.857 


3.049 




.222 


.667 


.048 


.241 


.110 


,416 




21 


.517 


.807 


ll._431 


.052 


.404 


1.007 




.106 


.182 


.575 




25 


1.245 


2.560 


12.966 


.090 


.315 


.753 


.105 


,106 


.155 


.654 


26 


1.388 


2.047 


35.775 


.079 


1.004 


1.074 


.196 


.087 


.605 


1.728 


27 


1.634 


2.908 


22.136 


.176 


1.578 


.731 


.297 


.305 


,114 


.777 


26 


2.189 


6.559 


26.498 


.333 


1.429 


,292 


.297 


1,101 


.419 


.962 


29 


2.016 


4.997 


14.395 


.273 


.540 


.098 


.431 


1,438 


. .252 


.317 




30 


1.510 


5.475 


22.444 


.210 


.666 


.109 


.479 


1.721 


.255 


.594 




31 


.818 


4.044 


3.277 


.090 


.228 




.196 


1.143 


.149 


.050 




32 


.790 


5.519 


5.281 


.090 


.195 


,194 


.148 


11 v 324 


.111 


.281 




33 


.547 


4.138 


5.504 




.129 




.096 


.642 




,168 


34 


.487 


1.953 


4.170 




.126 


.055> 


.096 


.984 


.111 


.. .059 


35 


.191 


1.101 


5.911 




.033 




.096 


.825 


.111 




36 


.270 


1.329 


2.625 




.096 




..105 


.228 


.076 




37 


.465 


.908 


2.889 




.033 






.087 






38 


.215 


.573 


1.435 








.048 








39 




.240 


1.679 










.141 






40 


.056 


.288 






.033 






.087 






41 




.096 














.034 






43 




.096 














.034 




« 






1.201 
















45 


.055 




















j 46 


._ - .. . 


_.__.Q9fi_ 


. i 


_ . . . . 


- 












47 


.080 


•— 


— — 









- 








11 


17.530 


46.922 


196.995 


2.002 


10.532 


8.806 


2.975 


16.831 


3.723 


8.215 




%h 


26.89 


.30.11 


27.79 


25.03 


24.82 


20.48 


28.17 


22.25 


25.13 


24.84 



Appendix 

Table 19. Stratified mean number per tow (un trans formed) for Atlantic herring 

length frequency intervals for regions 1-5, Massachusetts inshore 
bottom trawl survey, spring and autumn, 1982. 











SPRING 










AUTUMN 












Regions 






F 


ork 






















2 


ngth 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


1 * 


2 


3 


4 


5 


( 


cm) i 

2 
3 


• 


— ..... 


- 




























. 












4 


• 111 






















5 


1.058 






















6 


1.003 






















7 


• 056 


... 


- 


















8 
























9 
















.087 


1.189 




10 








. 






.130 


4.709 




11 


















2.461 




12 








..*Q8_2.„ 










1.115 






13 








.286 










.725 


.099- 




14 




- 




1.898 


-.084 














15 








2.980 


.•084 










.050 




16 








1.638 










.041 




| 


17 


.219 






.992 










.276 




IB 


.109 






.343 










1.375 




19 


.055 






.105 


.084 








1.734 




20 








.070 


.020 








1.186 


.040 


21 










.'i.04 








.187 


.040 




22 








.115 










.041 


.040 




23 








.070 


. 










.200 




-24 








.105 












.559 




25 








.035 ' 












.240 




26 








.070 












.060 




27 








.035 












.020 




28 




i 




<,.035 


- 










.020 


29 








.070 


• 










.020 


30 




j 




.035 
















31 
























32 
























33 
























34 








.035 






* 










35 
























36 
























37 






















38 
























39 
























40 








.041 














41 
























1 

42 
























43 






















44 
























45 
























46 






















47 






















•— — 4R 






















:al 


2.611 






9.043 


0.377 






0.217 


15.039 


1.387 




-ength 


7.23 






16.13 


17.59 






9.60 


13.25 


22.92 



Table 



20. Stratified mean number per tow ( unt ran s formed) for butterfish 

length frequency intervals for regions 1-5, Massachusetts inshore 
bottom trawl survey, spring and autumn, 1982. 



SPRING 



AUTUMN 



Regions 



c 


gth 
n) 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


i 






. 








1.193 
1.257 

38.538 

100.734 
174.531 
273.954 
116.432 

49.721 
9.989 _ 

...9.678_ 


•_288 

.719 

3.425 

11.536 

_16_.919_ 

20. 875 

14.442 

11.388 

~ 1.500 


1.859 

4.770 

19.138 

4.003 

.284 

.961 
.290 


.103 

.721 

1.896 

.256 

.460 

.504 

1.645 

2.094 

1.598 

.834 

.664 




9 










3 

4 


0.077 

























. . 






__ — 




6 






.059 


7 






.050 




8 
9 

10 
11 
12 

13 








.050 




— 





.031 
.092 






.153 








- - 


.347 








.105 




14 


0.111 
















.831 . 


.205 


15 


0.056 
















.762 


1.905 


16 
17 


0.110 




- - — 







.219 






.164 


.361 
.020 


. 18 
. 19 

.20 


0.055 


0.047 


- 


- 




1.038 








.040 
.125 

.200 


2L 

22 




0.047 




-- 










.041 




22 


._...... 




-- 


.... 














2A 




. — 


... 


■ - - 
















25 






. . 


„ . _ 


.... 














26 
27 




■ — — 


■ •- 








.022 
.022 










28 










29 














.. 













30 




. 


. ... .. _. 


_ ._ 


-. - 




._ 










31 






. _ 


. . . „_. 


. - 


— — 


. — __. .... 










32 






. _._ 





. 


_ . 










33 




... . 


. . „ 


.. _. __ 





— 


... 








34 






.. _ . _ .. 


, __ 


„ 


« 








- 


35 






... _. .. . 


__ . 










.... 




36 






_ . 


- ... 














37 
























38 
























39 






















40 






















41 






















42 






















43 






















44 






















45 






















| 46 






.... 


._. . . 


__ . 












47 






— 




















0.1+09 


0.095 








777.326 


81.092 


31.306 


12.574 


3.563 




'gth 


15.37 


.21.00 








7.74 


6.84 


7.00 


9.55 


14.19 



^m 






fable 21. Stratified mean number per tow (untransformed) for American sand lance 
length frequency intervals for regions 1-5, Massachusetts inshore 
bottom trawl survey, spring and autumn, 1982. 



SPRING 



AUTUMN 













Regions 










ength 

(cm) 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


i 


._. 





















2 






— — 







_3 





. 




. 4. 
5 


0.055 


0.192 _ 


















Jj 




0.048 


2._462 


— 




.. 


- 


- ■ 






8 
9 









— 






.468 
.473 
.053 


20.774 

43,037 

369,389 

1371.459 


.038 


.347 


61.980 




.695 


10 






8.091 


u 




Q.?_13Q 


14.841 


12 


469.423 


0.047 


9.582 . 






, , 




516.080 




18.564 


13 


628.833 




58, 6 52. _ 


0^900 . 


0.059 


_ 




41.255 




8.438 


14 


124.016 




115..457 


1_946- 




-_ 








2.035 


15 


17.725 




29.730 


1.841 












.347 


16 






12.942 


1.221 














17 






0.261 


0.229 














IS 






0.804 


0.114 












.347 


19 






0.130 

















20 






0.261 
















2. 






2.522 
















22 
- 23 




— 





- -- 














- 24 

25 
26 
























27 




... 


..... 


. . _ 














28 






















29 






















30 






















31 






















32 




._...... 


... 


. 




. 










33 






















34 










* 












35 






.... 
















36 






. . 
















37 










_. - 












38 










. . 














39 




... _ . 


















40 




_ . 


_ ._ 
















41 




_ _ 


. . _ 
















42 


... 




















43 






















44 






















45 






















<6 








- . 














47 






















H U. 
















• 






U 


1302.032 


0.287 


232.933 


6.252 


0.059 




0.993 


2361.994 


0.038 


53.707 


««th 


12.67 


6.32 


13.92 


14.72 


13.00 




9.58 


11.03 


10.00 


11.65 



appendix 
Table 22. 



Stratified mean number per tow (un trans formed) for spiny dogfish 
length frequency intervals for regions 1-5, Massachusetts inshore 
bottom trawl survey, spring and autumn, 1982. 



SPRING 



AUTUMN 



Regions 



Cength 
! -( cm) ■■ 



9 

5o 

i 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
6 
9 

6o 
i 

2 
3 

4 

5 
6 

7 

8 

9 

70 



.055 



.080 
.080 



.080 
.056 

.022 



.071 
.221 



.087 



.797 




.797 




.957 




.874 


.229 


2.473 




1.179 




7.754 




9.671 


.270 


9.025 




13.735 




6.214 




11.844 


.229 


7.111 




5.658 


.496 


8.545 


.229 


6.092 


.082 


18.141 


.082 


2.400 




10.000 


.041 


2.690 


.041 


13.560 


.045 


4.068 


.082 


6.232 


.041 


1.449 


.537 


4.924 


.578 



.020 



nppeuuxA laDie **• <.cont. ) 



SPRING 



AUTUMN 



Regions 



9 

9o 

1 

2 
3 

4 
5 

.6 
7 
6 

.9 

lQo 

i 

2 

3 

4 

i 
6 

7 

e 

9 

Ho 

i 

2 
3 
t 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

12 o 

l 



.055 
.271 

.204 
.078 
.201 

.221 
.153 
.312 
.453 
.665 

.321 
.233 
.503 

.135 

.187 
.240 

.066 
.077 
.055 
.022 



.047 
.048 



.048 



.221 
.353 

.221 

.353 

.141 

.592 
.734 
.565 

.451 
1.087 

.159 

1.034 

.283 

.424 

.071 
.141 



.071 



11.971 


.164 


29.590 


.659 


7.976 


.619 


10.114 


.578 


6.038 


.474 


3.358 


.352 


11.361 


.933 


5.043 


.618 


40.357 


.393 


11.632 


.157 


4.704 


.082 


19.623 


.311 


16.415 


.041 


5.739 


.082 


9.565 


.082 


4.783 


.079 


.957 




4.783 


.041 



.063 



.041 



tal 
Length 



4.662 
97.06 



0.143 
95.68 



7.353 
96.04 



360.285 
88.12 



8.683 
89.63 



0.083 
94.57 



«^^— *- 



LdD±e <-3' 



btratinea mean numDer per tow (untransformed) for little skate 
length frequency intervals for regions 1-5, Massachusetts inshore 
bottom trawl survey, spring and autumn, 1982. 



SPRING 



AUTUMN 



Regions 



th 

) 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


• 

1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


1 

2 
3 

4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 






* 


- 










.082 




10 






.154 












.038 




11 
12 


' 






.038 










.266 




13 


















.286 




14 






.462 


.076 










.247 


.050 


15 






_ .462-- 













.444 




16 


.160 


.048 




.038 










.162 




17 






.467 




.178 








.288 


.050 


18 


.080 




.154 




.119 








.529 




19 




.047 


.388 


.076 


.119 








.529 


♦ 050 


20 


.135 




.578 


.191 


.475 






.072 


.454 




21 


.135 




.424 


.082 










.354 


.199 


22 


1.100 




.902 


.041 










.650 


.050 


23 


1.242 


.096 


.918 


.076 


.119 








.821 


.050 


24 


1.051 


.096 


3.411 






.055 


.105 


.072 


.726 


.126 


25 


1.235 


.048 


5.589 


.079 




.109 


.105 


.072 


.850 


.050 


26 


1.725 


.048 


6.033 


.090 


.152 


.219 


.053 




.650 


.149 


27 


1.393 


.048 


4.563 






.055 


.249 




.564 


.109 


28 


.887 


.144 


5.317 




.297 


.131 


.249 


.148 


.605 


.271 


29 


1.039 


.144 


7.339 


.041 


.178 


.279 


.441 


.260 


.724 


.275 


30 


1.482 


.095 


6.252 


.079 


.119 


.557 


.100 


.641 


.479 


.149 


31 


1.859 


.096 


8.984 


.092 


.033 


.443 


.105 


.071 


.495 


,050 


32 


2.024 


.239 


10.217 


.052 


.360 


.306 


.210 


.633 


.407 


.229 


33 


1.668 


.096 


8.362 


.191 


.211 


.951 


.292 


.970 


.414 


.149 


34 


.887 


.334 


8.071 


.179 




.704 


.507 


.818 


.585 




35 


1.399 


.334 


4.873 


.128 


.178 


1.164 


.769 


.947 


.525 


.050 


36 


1.519 


.429 


6.279 


.153 


.182 


.803 


.402 


1.266 


.607 


.212 


37 


1.897 


.237 


4.882 


.166 


.363 


.694 


.105 


1.153 


.425 


.094 


38 


1.051 


.192 


2.277 


.314 


.063 


.975 


.580 


.839 


.346 


.269 


39 


1.390 


.143 


2.074 


.245 




.787 


.463 


.456 


1.634 




40 


2.940 




2.351 


.245 


.274 


1.189 


.537 


.308 


.872 


.031 


41 


1.352 


.524 


1.475 


.156 


.178 


.959 


.694 


.508 


.923 


.031 


42 


1.672 


.144 


2.228 


.114 




1.869 


.881 


1.153 


.650 




43 


1.912 


.667 


3.630 


.363 


.066 


2.253 


1.767 


1.184 


.736 


.063 


44 


4.193 


.479 


4.453 


.585 




4.182 


2.587 


1.153 


.880 


.031 


45 


5.044 


1.100 


4.275 


.261 


.033 


7.296 


2.998 


2.310 


.985 


.159 


46 


5.397 


.958 


4.618 


.474 


.066 


9.175 


4.046 


3.152 


1.370 


.130 


5^416 : 


1.290 


6.736 


.776 


.066 


6.470 


3.984 


3.884 


1.513 


:W 


- — ia. 


3.752 


.718 


7.149 


.287 


.099 


5.600 


2.724 


3.184 


2.742 


I 

to Sth 























Appendix Table 23. (Cont.) 



SPRING 



AUTUMN 



lei 












Regions 










igth 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


1 


2 


' 3 


4 


5 


-V 


9 


2.093 


.525 


4.002 


.514 




3.463 


1.950 


2.234 


v 

2.335 


,099 




5o 


1.296 


.526 


3.152 


• .867 


.262 


1.325 


1.130 


1.677 


2.806 


.510 




l 


.546 




1.236 


.910 


.228 


.623 


.441 


.620 


2.353 


.298 




2 


.109 


.047 


.424 


.694 


.225 


.449 


.048 


.179 


1.575 


.099 




3 




.095 


.154 


.308 


.417 






.106 


1.459 


.378 




4 








.076 


.865 


.060 






.916 


.258 


5 








.275 


.361 






- 


.682 - 


.149 


6 








.268 


.162 








.158 


.099 


7 








.079 


.162 


.060 








.113 


8 










.066 










.031 


9 








.041 


.033 




.048 






.059 




. 6o 
i 




















.050 




2 






















3 






















1 - 4 






















1 ' 5 
























6 
























7 
8 
























9 

7o 

1 
























t 

2 
























3 
























4 




* 




















5 
























6 






















7 






- 


















8 
























9 
























80 

1 






















2 






















3 






















4 






















5 






















1 6 






















7 
























61.082 


9.985 


145.315 


9.725 


6.707 


53.204 


28.568 


30.071 


38.139 


5.372 




*ugin 


39.24 


42.09 


35.49 


44.11 


40.47 


44.15 


43.89 


43.12 


39,93 


40.42 



— 



Table 24. Stratified mean number per tow (untransformed) for winter skate 

length frequency intervals for regions 1-5, Massachusetts inshore 
bottom trawl survey, spring and autumn, 1982. 



SPRING 



AUTUMN 



Regions 



jngth 
cm) 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


i 

2 
3 

4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 










- 












11 






















12 






















13 






















14 






















15 




. 


_. -■■ — - 

















16 






















17 






















18 






















19 






















20 






















21 


.022 
















.038 




22 






















i 

23 


















.041 




24 






















25 






















1 " 


.055 








.033 








.082 




27 


















.041 




28 


.055 


.048 


.154 
















29 


.080 
















.124 




30 


.189 




.154 




.066 








.165 




31 


.164 




1.708 




.066 








.206 


.050 


32 


.459 




2.062 






.060 






.124 




33 


.709 




.937 




.099 


.077 


.053 




.082 


.205 


34 


.953 


.048 


2.255 






.202 


.263 


.145 


:i65 


.050 


35 


1.060 


.095 


3.442 




.033 


.066 


.354 


.077 


.330 




36 


.891 


.096 


4.904 


.090 


.066 


.596 


.943 


.303 


.371 


.149 


37 


1.059 


.192 


4.585 


.114 


.066 


.393 


.642 


.632 


.371 


.050 


38 


.609 


.143 


2.784 


.090 


.066 


.781 


1.139 


.457 


.405 


.317 


39 


.828 


.240 


3.127 


.141 


.033 


.492 


.900 


,467 


.554 


.298 


40 


1.094 


.240 


5.413 


.153 


.066 


.578 


.922 


.950 


.354 


.347 


41 


.828 


.047 


4.569 


.114 




.850 


.991 


1.294 


.240 


.099 


42 


.395 


.238 


3.629 


.141 


.066 


.649 


.870 


.878 


.124 


.229 


43 


.456 


.095 


1.168 


.141 


.033 


.333 


.957 


.463 


.247 


,149 


44 


.120 


.096 


3.370 


.294 


.096 


.231 


.301 


.795 


.082 


.347 


45 


.430 


.239 


3.361 




.066 


.260 


.904 


1.139 


.347 


.149 


46 


.110 


.047 


3.889 


.131 


.218 


.290 


1.014 


.721 


.124 


.050 


47 


.301 


.334 


3.275 


.076 


.059 


.398 


.655 


1.377 


.079 


.291 




.700 


.096 


3.101 




.059 


.523 


.895 


1 .RSI 


.Q73 


.208 


H 

%h 


i 





















Appendix Table 24. (Cont.) 









SPRING 










AUTUMN 


* 










Regions 










1 iength 

(f"TTl) 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


1 


2 


' 3 


4 


5 


j 

9 


.243 


.191 


1.132 




- 


.410 


.664 


1.295 


.034 


.168 


5o 


.486 


.335 


2.007 


.038 


.159 


.120 


.411 


1.246 


.034 


.050 


l 


.056 


.191 


2.444 




.096 




.263 


1.373 




.099 


2 


.166 


.096 


1.522 


.038 


.252 


.164 


.249 


1.204 


.034 




3 


.222 


.048 


1.464 




.063 


.164 


.406 


1.684 




.050 


4 


.056 


.096 


2.047 




.122 




.345 


.965 




.050 


5 


.133 


.095 


1.792 




.063 


.055 


.301 


.869 


_.075_. 


J)50 - 


6 


.247 




1.790 




.251 


.077 


.445 


1.831 




.113 


7 


.022 


.143 


1.366 




.258 


.055 


.253 


1.777 


.073 


,285 


8 


.056 


.143 


1.486 




.063 


.164 


.349 


1.439 




.080 


9 


.080 


.144 


1.078 




.063 


.109 


.244 


1.536 




.099 


6o 


.510 


.144 


2.181 




.129 


.055 


.340 


3.465 




.105 


l 


.157 




.728 






.055 


.244 


2.934 


,034 




2 


.111 


.048 


.766 






.055 


.301 


1.532 


.041 




3 




.048 


.774 






.273 


.105 


1.222 


.034 




- 4 


.056 


.144 


.928 






.164 


.096 


1.979 


.034 




5 


.078 


.142 


1.083 






.055 


.148 


1.762 






6 


.055 


.143 


1.096 






.333 


.301 


1.176 






7 


.296 


.095 


1.873 






.120 


.201 


2.149 


.034 




1 8 


.192 


.047 


.437 






.373 


.048 


2.839 


.041 




9 


.110 




.643 








.096 


0.830 


.034 




7o 


.580 


.143 


.141 






.164 


.192 


2.518 


.034 




i 


.111 


.286 


.295 






.055 


.053 


.888 


.034 




2 


.246 


.047 


.335 










1.453 






3 


.055 


.047 


.339 






.219 




.563 






4 


* 




.531 






.109 


.053 


1.588 






5 


.110 




.154 






.055 


.096 


1.035 


.034 




6 




.096 


.290 




.033 


.109 


.053 


.305 


.034 




j 7 


.056 




.130 




.033 






1.815 






8 


.136 


.095 


.264 






.109 




1.390 






9 






.571 






.219 




1.489 






80 

1 


.056 
.111 




.431 
.283 




.033 


.164 
.378 


.048 


.745 
.374 






2 


.136 


.095 


.607 




.033 


.403 


.048 


1.361 






3 


.216 


.095 


.495 






.055 




.183 






4 


.111 


.144 


.123 






.055 


.048 


.744 






5 




.239 


.275 






.139 




.231 






1 


.192 


.144 


.295 


.038 




.324 




.308 






7 


.055 


.143 
.096 


.185 
.908 






.055 
.194 




.214 
.237 


.113 




1 

ngth 























L 



Appendix Table 24. (Cont. ) 



SPRING 



AUTUMN 













Regions 












1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


• 

1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


1 

9 


.056 


.048 


.339 




• 


* 

.055 


.048 


.212 


.034 




9o 

l 


.056 


.238 
.048 


.797 
.221 


.038 


.033 
.033 






.141 
.998 


.034 




2 


.056 


.096 


.397 




.033 






.816 




.063 


3 




.048 


1.085 










.141 






4 




.048 


.777 






.055 




.043 






5 


..111 




.975 






— 




.141 






.6 




.048 


.295 




.033 






.393 






7 




.048 


.116 




.063 






.213 






8 






.353 






.055 




.850 






.9 




.096 


.141 










.154 






IQo 

i 






.080 




.033 




.048 










2 






.141 


















3 
























4 






.592 
















5 






.159 
















1 7 






















E 






.080 


















lie 

1 






















2 
























3 

> 
























5 
























6 






















7 






















8 






















9 






















12 o 






















1 

2 






















3 






















< 

c 


t 




















6 






















! 


.7 
























1 


17.347 


6.976 


99.725 


-1.638 


3.074 


12.545 


18.299 


68.212 


5.594 


4.199 






Igth 


47.67 


60.99 


51.33 


44.15 


53.02 


54.50 


47.63 


63.26 


42.15 


45.68 



Table 25 



Stratified mean number per tow (untransformed) for longfin squid 
length frequency intervals for regions 1-5, Massachusetts inshore 
bottom trawl survey, spring and aut'imn, 1982 # 



Dorsal 
to-tle 






SPRING 




Regions 




AUTUMN 






£ngtn 












• 










(cm) 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


i 


.056 
" .801 

.i.~245 

1.044 
.446 


.863 

2.827 

" 1.101 

.622 


.080 

.638 
.717 
.154- 






59.769 

129.060 
121.739 

199.611 

162.747 

74.083 


29.411 
311.556 
177_.538__ 
152.848 
119.941 


7 . 314 

175,991 

195.371 

55. 886 

25.228 


.477 

73.661 
230.229 

370.144 

199.450 

84.387 




2 

4 


- - 





.245 
1.558. 

2.605 


5 


T~ 


- • - 


.994 


A 


32.802 


8.662 


.142 


7 
8 


.390 
.749 


.381 
.240 


.239 





. .. — 


43.357 
31.661 


14.431 
7.557 


6.003 
2.793 


21.672 
5.256 


.031 
.031 


9 


.556 


.285 


.221 






23.052 


2.217 




1.282 


.061 


10 


,74.3_ 


. .762 


1.234 






7.943 


2.532 




1.355 


.123 


11 


1.050 


1.-049 


.154 






1.459 


.258 




.165 


.031 


12 


1.605 


2.143 


.154 






9.803 


.048 




.165 


.063 


13 


.778 
.834 
.'668 


1.519 


.616 




- - 


1.415 
.120 


.048 
.205 




.038 
.034 
.073 


.031 " 




14 
15 


1.807 
1.140 


.924 


.063 




16 


.056 


1.043 


.616 






2.623" 


I. T048_. 




.038 




17. 


.334 


.666 


.770 












.069 




i. 


.111 


.666 


.462 














.063 




.. 


.056 


.759 


.308 


. 
















20 


.111 


.477 


.542 


















21 


.056 


.190 


.308 


















22 
23 




.381 
.189 


.308 
.616 


















- 24 


.056 


.095 


.462 






_ .. 










! 


25 




.236 


.462 
















2« 




.189 


.154 
















27 




.190 


.462 
















28 




.095 


.770 
















29 




.142 


.154 


















30 




.095 


.462 
















31 




.095 


.308 
















32 




/047 


.462 
















33 




.047 


.462 
















34 






















35 






. 616 ~ 
















36 






.616 
















37 






.154 
















38 




. 


















39 






















40 




_• 


















41 






















42 






















43 






















44 






















< 5 
























1 46 








- 
















47 

— ■IB 








- - - 
















u 


11.746 


20.338 


13.603 






868.443 


851.442 


477.248 


988.494 


6.040 




; ngth 


9.67 


12.38 


20.73 






4.35 


3.30 


2.96 


4.10 


4.51 



ftp >endix 
'Table 26, 



Stratified mean number per tow (untransformed) for American lobster 
length frequency intervals for regions 1-5, Massachusetts inshore 
bottom trawl survey, spring and aut'Jim, 1982. , 









SPRING 




- 




.- 


AUTUMN 






Carapace 


Regions 










Length 

(nun} 


1 





3 


u 


5 


• 

1 


5 


3 


H 


5 


^__L 









.. . - - .... 


— 


. 


— 


-- 






.... ? 
3 
4 


------ 




-.- 













— 






5 
6 
7 
6 


* 


- • 





— 











- 




_ — . — 














9 








-—- 


' - 


— - - - ■ 












10 

11 


._ 


. — . 


— — — 





. .. 








— .. 




12 


. 


. 





4» ... - 









— 






13 


. 


. 


— 





- 












.14 




...... 





. 


- - 


- 




- - 






-15 




- - — 





-i 




-- 


._ _ ... 








16 









. _- U 




. 










17 




- 




- — 


... 


■ - 


- 






■ 


18 








- " - 




.... 










19 






• 





- - - 












20 






■ ■ - 


.. 















21 








- - 














22 










. .. . 












23 









... 


• — ... — 












24 






. .. 




.. 


— - 










25 






— 




.. 












26 






_ — 




... ■._ .- 












27 









- . — 


.. ... 


- 










» 

29 






... _.. 


... 










.069 




30 










... 












31 









_ 














32 




_ 


._ 


_. 


- - 












33 






















34 
35 


.055 

(.1 












» 




.103 




36 


* i. 
















.275 




37 


















.344 




36 
39 

40 










• H g 








.103 


.189 


41 
42 
43 
44 

* 

46 

48 
49 


.022 


.048 





- — 


.119 
.152 

.033 


.055 
.055 






.137 
.069 
.069 
.103 
.110 

.213 
.221 
.176 


.252 
.050 
.050 


50 


.055 






.038 


.119 


.055 






.176 


.050 



^ 



1 



Appendix Table 26. (Cont.) 

American lobster, 1982 



SPRING 



AUTUMN 



japace 










Regions 










gth 


1 





a 


4 


5 


• 

1 





a 


u 


5 


li. 

J 












,124 






. .148 
,320 
,485 

,.03.6 

.148 




.055 










,099 










.270 

.237 


,126 






— 


.076 


.050 










.176 


a 


_.2_62_ 






. jtOafiL. 


.356 
.237 






- - -- 


_..3Q1 

,480 
.107 


.061 






.038 


— 


— — - — - - 






.048 




.458 


6 








.128 


.270 
•211 








.279 
.275 


.225 


.055 






.487 


'' 


.022 







.128 


__.4„22 
.211 


.055 
.077 




.744 


.150 
.354 


.216 




.166 


.395 


; 


.131 

.055 
.055 


_.._.. . 




.083 


.653 

.640 
.607 

.696 


.022 
_.070 


. - 




.385 
.320 
. .153 
.379" 




■' 


.041 


.312 




.076 


.454 






.584 


7 


.055 








.508 








.183 


.282 




.077 


_..._.. 


... — . 


.038 
.038 


.686 
.686 


.070 






.277 
.145 


.440 
.149 


7o 


.055 








.515 




- 




.314 


.690 




.080 


.047 


— 


. .079 
.076 


,_567. 
.548 

.548. 


• 






.198 
.192 
.117 


.468 
.645 

.530 


- * 


.022 _ 


...__...... 


— _ 


.083 


508 

.518 


-- - 


— 




.401 
.076 


.489 
.653 


6 






.043 


.038 


.447 


.055 






.123 


.613 


! 7 








.038 


.277 


.022 






.311 


.657 


' 


.055 




;.080 


.079 


.747 
.363 








.083 
.076 


.938 
.393 


80 

; 




• 


- - ■ 


.045 
.045 


.096 
.152 

.033 
.'119 


- 




.744 


.243 
.076 
.122 
.086 

.079 
.079 

.041 


.565 
.437 
.608 
.245 
.296 
.332 
.377 


1 8 






- - -— — 


.041 


.266 








.038 
.332 


.446 
.394 


9 










.117 








.082 


.690 


\ 






.072 


.038 


.287 

.127 
.084 

.020 




.048 




.038 
.045 


.170 

.503 
.420 
.325 

.113 
.020 
.109 




_ 




— 


— , — , - 


- • 








.045 


.050 


1 1 

1 


- - 




• - - — 


• 


.031 




.048 




< 


.050 


10 ( 

1 


»— — 






- ■ - 


.020 













*HM 



MOT 



Appendix Table 26. (Cont.) 

American lobster, .1982 









- SPRING 








AUTUMN 






rapace 








Regions 








igth 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


I 


2 


3 


4 


5 


10J-. 

2 

3 
4 
5 
6 




















.050 


— - 














.084 




.045 


.050 




.048 




— 


,176_ 


— 





... . 


— 





— 


7 

8 

9 

110 

11 

12 

13 


— 


— 


■ 







- ■ 


- - - - ■ 


- 


.041 







» 









.031 









.. ._ . _ 






. - 


— 






14 
15 




• 


— 




.033 












16 






















17 






- - • 

















IB 










- 












19 




. . 


















120 
21 












• 


.048 








22 




. . . — - 


- 


- 


. ._ 












23 










- 












24 






----- --■•-- 


-■ 














25 






_... 
















26 






_ . 
















17 






















28 








_ 














| 29 






















130 






-■ 
















156 










. ._. 






5 156 mm 




• 


















.077 


1 




1 


1.107 


0.191 


0.196 


1.454 


13.736 


0.657 


0.144 


1.565 


10.378 


17.634 


\% 


60.84 


69.74 


82.74 


67.48 


69.48 


59.18 


104.67 


77.08 


62.33 


75.25 



u 



Appendix ^^ 
^TaLie 27. 



Stratified mean number per tow (untrans formed) for Rock crab 
length frequency intervals for regions 1-5, Massachusetts inshore 
bottom trawl survey, spring and autv.nn, 1982. 



SPRING 



AUTUMN 



.-apace 










RftRinns ■ 










idth 

lm) 

_i 

2 
3 

4 
5 
6 
7 
8 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


• 

1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


• 912 

~2.488 
2.481 
*4.368 






.041 
__±1?1_. 




__..399_ 

_._^ioa 

_ -568 
2.128 


.048 


.087 

.283 
.272 


. . 4.199 

10.532 

1Q...812 
.412_ 

.313__. 
1.297 .. 
13.390 
32.494 






. .154 




.142 
.238 


.234 
1.643 




.103_ 
,75J5._.. 


__^.oa3_ 

.099 . 


.199 


.286 
.096 


4.542 

._. 5.013 . 
._ 7.616. 
10.466_ 


.048 


_ 1.329 
3.963 

10.436 
9.553 


.414 


622_ 

__l._35fL. 


._ . .938 
1.806 


1.562 


_H.Q19_. 


.095 


5.675 


6.354 


.096 


__„a,3Q8 


_ .225 


2. 504 


20.487 


9 

.10 

11 

12 

13 


2.592 


.048 


7.585 

4_._803_ 


4.545 
3.366 


._288__ 

..5.28. 

.205 

.063 


6.430 

.3.249 

._ 3.482 

.231 


.345 
.358 
.292 


8.208 

4.447 

1.407 

.807 

.371 
.072 


26.694 

11 . 746 

4.947 

3.108 

1.134 


9.772 


3.382 




4.811 


2.044 




1.007 


1.788 _ 


3.632 


.911 
•102 




.750 


.841 

_ ^153 


1.881 


— 


. 


.865 
.094 


u 




. . 














.038 


.031 


15 
16 
17 










- - ■ 


' - 






.153 
.079 




18 












— 










19 










— 













20 










- 












21 














- 








22 










- - - 












23 










. . — 












.24 


._ . 


._.. -. - 


















25 










- 












26 






. . . 


— 














27 


_ 




. . . - 


_ 















28 




. 


._. 


.■.._ _ . 














29 






















30 






















31 






















32 






















33 






















34 










V 












35 






















36 






















37 






















38 






















39 






















40 






















41 






















42 






















43 






















44 






















4S 

46 










































! o 






_ 
















r 41 - 






















29.653 


1.000 


43.812 


15.021 


1.441 


21.081 


4.224 


41.235 


121.348 


49.422 


"Sth 


7.46 


5.24 


7.62 


. 9.25 


9.46 


8.48 


7.97 


8.04 


7.34 


8.65 



ACME 
WOKBINDiNG CO, WCL ' 

•<&> CAMBRIDGE Sf^Mf 
XAtf LESTQWN, MA$V